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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The swarm i captured from the broken tree limb, up and left a couple of weeks ago. I didn't use the queen excluder to keep her in. I read that it's only good for cooling baked bread. The speaker box hive swarmed last week. i put them back in hive box this past friday, using a carboard box. I used my front end loader on my tractor to raise box under hive. went to check on them today, and they were gone. I have gone after 5-swarms this summer, hived three of those colonies, and combined a couple, and had 1-colony given to me in april, which is still going strong. last week, i was feeling confident, today i'm just wondering. Maybe just ought to buy some strong hives. Is this a good time to buy strong hives from retireing beekeepers to go through the winter?
 

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Here is what I have done this year and had good that has worked for me. Make up or buy a 4 or 5 frame Nuc Box. Put drawn comb in it. [This gives ther Queen a place to lay as soon as they move in] with some Lemongrass oil for bait. Place it 8 or 10 ft. above the ground in the area of known bee hive such as in houses or bldg's. You don't have to be there when they swarm as they just move in and if they like it you have a start of a hive. Leave them a week or 2 to get settled in. I have caught 5 swarms this way this year and they are all doing good. Hope this helps.
 

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E.T.Pine Rooter: Next time you start to hive a searm, if you can pull a frame of brood at all stages of development minus the bees, and give it to the swarm. That generally will hold them 99% of the time.
Walt
 

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Rooter:

If you are having so many swarms abscond you are doing something wrong. In 60 years of beekeeping I have had one swarm leave, and that because I put them in a hive that still smelled of mothballs--did not air it out long enough. I've lost many swarms, but not after I once get them in a hive.

Are you putting something in your hives other than foundation? Are you locating your hives in some place the bees cannot accept? Are ants invading them?

Are the bees Africanized? African bees abscond to follow the honeyflow.
Ox
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm putting the bee in a deep brood box, with there rubber banned brood. I am using a #8 screened bottom frame, without a bottom board, and a top entrance. I feed with a 1/1 syrup. i treated around hives with a granular ant poison, that keeps them at bay for a year. As for as africanized, i don't think so. i'm in a county where they haven't been documented yet, but they are in the counties around us. i did have one colony eat me up, but i didn't use smoke, my faught. i'm going to relocate them out of the pine trees, to up hehind my barn, which is in the hardwoods.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>I'm putting the bee in a deep brood box, with there rubber banned brood. I am using a #8 screened bottom frame, without a bottom board, and a top entrance.

I never leave the bottom board open on a swarm. I open it after they settle in. They don't usually look for homes with no bottom in them.

> I feed with a 1/1 syrup.

Feeding doesn't hurt as long as it doesn't set off robbig.

>i treated around hives with a granular ant poison, that keeps them at bay for a year.

Don't know much about ant poison. I figure the ants are as much a part of the ecology as the bees and they never really do any harm to my bees. Is there sugar in the ant poison? Is it possible the bees are collecting it?

Is there a dearth in the area? Maybe they just don't like where you are and want to go somewhere else?
 

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Depending on how much you charge to do a colony removal, it may be cheaper to buy bees a lot less trouble, and better chanc for success. You can buy bees now and take them thru the winter if you get a very good price on them. You will probably have better success if you buy them in early spring, but they may be more expensive. If you continue to do colony removals, I suggest you become familiar with Texas Law regarding bee removal so you don't get in trouble.
 

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>I suggest you become familiar with Texas Law regarding bee removal so you don't get in trouble.

Now that's a concept. Laws about bee removals, who'd a thunk it?

Makes me feel like I live in some backward hick state with no regulation. Not a bad trade off when you think about it.
 

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I understand the story goes something like this. Someone please straighten me out if I don't have it right. When AHB came to Texas the strucural pest control board was able to get a regulation inacted stateing only certified Pest Control Technicians can remove bees from any man made structure. Beekeepers can not charge for removing bees, can use no chemicals to exterminate bees, can use no man made devices to collect bees (bee vac). I assume the structural pest control board lobbied for the regulation because they expected a windfall of bee extermination profits. If you become a certified pest control technician, I guess you can charge and use whatver you want. I have heard these regulations have caused some problems for beekeepers, but I cannot reference any specific incident or lawsuit.
 
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