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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ANOTHER QUESTION. (sorry, beesource.com)

When I went into my Russian hive yesterday to split it in two, I saw several empty swarm cells on the bottom of the frames. I guess they were thinking of swarming, but didn't, or at least not yet. I know you can use swarm cells as new queen cells for a split, but if they're empty, are they still usable? Or do they have to be capped/occupied?
 

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I suppose you could graft into them but they do need to have larva.
 

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ANOTHER QUESTION. (sorry, beesource.com)

When I went into my Russian hive yesterday to split it in two, I saw several empty swarm cells on the bottom of the frames. I guess they were thinking of swarming, but didn't, or at least not yet. I know you can use swarm cells as new queen cells for a split, but if they're empty, are they still usable? Or do they have to be capped/occupied?
When you say empty, do you mean a. queen cups that have never been used or b. queen cells that have already emerged?

Like Salty Dog said, you would have to a correctly aged larvae into the cup.
 

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Unless I misunderstand your question, what you're asking is analogous to asking whether or not you'll get a chicken from a broken, empty eggshell. The answer is no. You won't get a queen from an empty queen cell. There must be an appropriately aged larvae in the cell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you. Since this particular hive did not swarm (yet) the cups had not been used, and were uncapped and empty, like they were thinking about swarming but not too seriously I guess. Unless there was an egg in at least one that I didn't see.
 
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