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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I've just written an article on the identification of chemical polutants - I thought it might be useful, so here it is:

http://1279honey.com/articles/a_whatskillingthebees.asp

I've got a few more articles on the site (but no forum as the site is primarily an outlet for my existing customers).

Hope it's useful to someone and please, if you have any ideas which could make it more effective please let me know, I'm always in the market for improvement.

and if anyone looks at the gallery I'm afraid it's not working at the moment, a problem with my host I think (working on it).

Paul.
 

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I copied and pasted the following from your article what is in the parenthisis(sp?) and added comments after the (-)

•"Your bees are all gone"-not always, queen and small group of young bees left

•"There is no trace of disease"-sometimes more than one pathogen or virus

•"There is no trace of pollutants"-many contaminents(chemicals-beekeeper and crop related) can be found in the hive

•"There are no bees at all – not even dead ones, left in the hive"-look back at top line

I'm not trying to cut down your article(which it appears I am) but I am trying to give you "better" info. I'm no more of an expert than you and I live in a different country. It's great to see that you are trying to help
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Beeslave,
thanks for the comments - it's quite interesting that there appear to be a couple of differences over here.

1. When we talk about CCD it really is an empty box, a hive with a quen and young is normally considered as a weak hive over here
2. No trace of disease - I meant if we ignore naturally occurring stuff like a little varroa but disease is far less prolific over here (serious disease control over here includes words like 'fire' and 'hole' we don't do a lot of chemical treatment for serious stuff (even for stuff that you might consider as 'background').

That being said it was really interesting to see your comments, I think I'll be updating my article to include a few of them, I think it's good for people to see that there are slight differences.

Thanks for taking the time to pass on the info - appreciated,
Paul.
 

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All of those symptoms only indicate dwindle without these two primary markers of CCD... (though by how often the term is thrown around inappropriately it's a wonder anyone has any idea at all of what it is)...

1st primary marker of CCD: very few or no adult bees, but plenty of brood.

2nd primary marker of CCD: the pollen and honey stores in the affected hive are not and will not be robbed, even if the affected hive is opened up and frames of honey pulled and left out.

Also, the autopsies of the remaining bees show that they are basically falling apart, the closest thing in humans that I could compare it to would be either stage 4 cancer or maybe full blown AIDS, or perhaps both.

Interrestingly, I can think of a way to simulate CCD if anyone wants to kill off one of their colonies just for the sake of doing it... but it wouldn't really prove anything since the autopsies on the remaining bees wouldn't be the same as those on CCD affected colonies... but if you want to simulate it, just spray bee-quick or bee-go on all the comb on each frame which should drive all the adult bees that can leave to leave. The Queen which can't fly until starved for a few days will be left behind with maybe a couple of really faithful nurse bees, and all the other outward symptoms would appear to be the same as well.

Of course, even here in the U.S. the term CCD is frequently thrown around when beekeepers who at least ought to know better blame everything from starvation to SHB on CCD... because CCD is conveniently not something that the beekeeper could have avoided, but all the other things could have been.
 
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