Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
It could be; it certainly looks like it but a shot of the end (bottom) would help to tell for certain. You want to check for presence of a larvae inside if possible. It looks like you hive might be superseding your queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I think that suggests it is a queen cell and that the hive is/has likely killed (or will kill or she is dead) the queen and is replacing her. At this point you should leave the hive closed up and come back in about 25 days; it takes 16 days from egg to hatch for the queen + 2-3 days for harden + 5-8 days to mate and then she can start laying. You don't want to open the hive up during this time; just be patient.

The other option would be to tear down the queen cell and install a new queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
So my next question is what is better to let it happen or requeen
I let it happen. All seemed to work out. It sure sets the hive back a bit though.
If you re-queened, I'm sure that would set things back too, but it might get eggs a few days sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
So my next question is what is better to let it happen or requeen
Your choice. I find that queens naturally mated, at least in my area are better than any queen I've ever had in a package or purchased separately. I think this is because package bees are mated early in the year before there are sufficient drones to give a good mating (my opinion).

The downside is that you are 25 days before you will have new bees but it's still early enough in the year to do it. If you find that waiting 25 days to see if your hive raised and mated a queen is more than you want then your other choice is to purchase a queen but be sure to kill existing queens or cells of the 2 will fight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Yup, a cup. Concerned? No need. Unless occupied, cups don't mean much. Other than maybe they are "Boy Scout Bees". Always prepared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
The end was open I saw I bee stick its head in I couldn't see a egg or a larva.
I would have torn it off just because of where it is and the burr comb it is formed on and then not give it another thought. It looks like you have brood. Relax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,646 Posts
>The end was open I saw I bee stick its head in I couldn't see a egg or a larva.
I always see bees sticking their heads in empty queen cups, it means nothing.
Take your hive tool and tear just enough of the cell wall to see in. If you need to keep the cell the bees will rebuild it.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top