Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had these bees for a little over a month now and they connected the two center frames like this. When my partner placed the Queen box in, the bees had started building comb on it to connect it to the hive. He had hung the Queen box between two frames (so it was a 9 frame langstroth hive instead of 10) and now they’ve been building comb between two frames instead of on each frame separately it seems. He wants to leave it because he doesn’t see a problem, but I’m very concerned that they’re going to build the top of the comb out and cross comb even more. He thinks that it can be resolved next summer after the hive is more established, but I’m a little worried so I figured I’d reach out to other bee fam to get some advice 👌
Also: he’s adamant about not killing any larva, but I don’t know if that’s possible if he keeps waiting. I hope I’m overreacting and that this really is nothing 😂
63954
63955
63956
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,350 Posts
Eventually larvae need to die. But that depends on how many frames of brood there are. Wait till there are 2 or 3 patches on the frames on the sides of that. Then do the deed. All part of beekeeping.
If it is still warm when its split open and its still attached to one of the frames, put that frame on the edge of the box and move brood chamber that way. The queen will lay in the middle and when that mess hatches out you can scrape off.
Leaving this in place hampers inspections and if the queen is under that comb you could squish her easily moving frames around.
Welcome aboard. Looks like you are off to a great start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
You could take it out and put it in another frame. Take an empty frame, take out the foundation, cut the comb to size, slide it in and put a rubber band around it to hold it there. The bees will secure it and et at the rubber bands and take them out.
 

·
Registered
4ish langstrom hives
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
You could take it out and put it in another frame. Take an empty frame, take out the foundation, cut the comb to size, slide it in and put a rubber band around it to hold it there. The bees will secure it and et at the rubber bands and take them out.
x2 this is what I would recommend doing.

In the future push all of the frames tightly together to prevent this from happening again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You could take it out and put it in another frame. Take an empty frame, take out the foundation, cut the comb to size, slide it in and put a rubber band around it to hold it there. The bees will secure it and et at the rubber bands and take them out.
My major concern is that this is the only frame they’ve built on for the month that I’ve had them, so I don’t want to screw them for the coming winter by wrecking too much of the brood
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
The bees have likely built on more frames. Watch videos on youtube about "cut outs". Typically, this method is used when taking bees from a house/tree/non-hive as the comb need to go from not framed to framed. You take it out, put it in a frame, and put it back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,474 Posts
The advice giving so far is the correct course of action in my opinion. As stated, if you don't correct the problem it will likely get worse.

This looks like plastic foundation. The bees have likely attached burr comb to the foundation on either side of the drawn comb, making it difficult to remove. If that is the only drawn comb the Queen is probably on it or very nearby. Remove the other frames on one side so you can pull the one next to this drawn comb away ever so slightly to give yourself some room to cut it loose.

New comb is very soft, so be careful. If it collapses all is not lost, just pick it up and place in a frame with rubber bands as described by others. Do check out some videos on cutouts.

I see where your partner is coming from not wanting to destroy any larvae. New package installations typically lose population while waiting for new bees to emerge. If you decide to leave it as is for a while I would closely monitor the new comb being drawn as small populations are notorious for building comb offset from the plastic foundation. A fact I learned, from members here, when I started using plastic.

When bees start out building comb wrong (for our purposes) they have no incentive to change or correct it. It is up to us to provide that incentive.
Also, it is against the law to not have all comb attached to removable frames of some sort to facilitate inspections from the state Bee Inspectors.

Either way, good luck.

Alex
 

·
Registered
An assortment of mediums, deeps and now a Long Langstroth Horizontal Hive
Joined
·
5 Posts
I have run across this situation before as well and had the same fears as you. I can tell you from experience that the longer you wait the more damage will be caused in the long run. I ended up cutting the comb and doing the rubber band method metioned already. It worked great and about a week later I found the rubber band on the ground under the hive. It will be fine and you will do great. Best of luck to you both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,369 Posts
The burr comb should be removed immediately regardless brood or not.

First though, incase it is possible to save the burr comb we need to know this - are the frames foundationless or do they have foundation. If they have foundation is it wax or plastic. If plastic is it wax coated.

How best to proceed will depend on the answers to that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The burr comb should be removed immediately regardless brood or not.

First though, incase it is possible to save the burr comb we need to know this - are the frames foundationless or do they have foundation. If they have foundation is it wax or plastic. If plastic is it wax coated.

How best to proceed will depend on the answers to that.
Plastic wax coated foundation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,369 Posts
My suggestion would be remove a frame or two from the edge of the box so you can then push the burr comb plus the frame each side of it along a bit and have room to lift all of them out together. But before you lift them out, give it a really good smoking to drive as many bees off the burr comb as possible.

Then lift them out and lay on top of the hive on their side. You can now prise the top frame off the burr comb. It will have bits of comb bracing stuck to it, so scrape them down to the foundation so the bees can build proper comb on that foundation. If any good comb on the foundation be sure to leave that. Put that frame to one side then hold the other comb plus the burr comb inside the gap in your hive and jiggle or shake the whole thing to get most or all bees off it including hopefully, the queen. Then lay back on it's side and carefully peel off the burr comb. If you did not see the queen already, be mindful she could be in there so go carefully and use smoke if needed to drive the bees back.

As you get the burr comb or bits of it off, shake any bees on it into the gap in the hive. Clean the face of the other frame with a hive tool; so there are not bits of bracing comb on it that will make the bees build burr comb again.

The burr comb should be discarded brood and all, and the frames put back in the hive. One of them should be turned around the other way so there is less chance of the bees building another comb in between, and the combs should be pushed hard against each other. If there is no comb built on any other frames, just double check they really are waxed.

If there is little or no honey, the hive should be fed sugar syrup which will encourage comb building and egg laying. That is very important.

Seems drastic but getting a mess like that cleaned up as soon as possible allows the bees to put their resource where you want them to be.

That's my advice and it's what I would do. However, you got to keep peace with your boyfriend of course so if doing what I said is too scary for the two of you, then yes, it could be left and cleaned up at a later stage. However my own experience with these situiations is they are better cleaned up soon as possible. But, gotta keep the peace, if removing any brood is too painful for your boyfriend, leaving it for now will not be the end of the world. Just, eventually surgery will have to be done, and later, will be harder.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top