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During inspection of my first hive split I noticed strings of pollen on one of the frames. Then on closer inspection saw a trail eaten through the comb. Just before closing it up I saw a 1" white grub (larvae) on the side of the super. I killed it but don't know if there are more in the hive. This hive has yet to make a new queen though it does have two queen cells on the bottom of one frame. Should I do frequent inspections to kill anymore larvae that show up. I hate to disturb the colony too much since it's Queenless.
 

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Hive may be a little weak.Pull the frame put it in the freezer for a day and that should take care of it.I wouldn't stress to much about it.If it's wax moths there will be some webbing if it's hive beetles it will get slimey and have kind of a rotten citrus smell(like oranges in the garbage)Either one tells you hive is getting weak and may need a boost.
 

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It's primary problem is that it is queenless. It's next problem is not enough bees to guard the comb. I don't know what your plan is for the queenless issue, but obviously it will need to be resolved.

The second issue can be resolved by compressing the hive. Remove any comb that the bees are not currently occupying and put it in the freezer. Try to reduce them down to only the number of boxes they can fill with bees. After that they will be able to remove the remaining larvae but you could still help out if it's pollen or honey (not brood) you could freeze, thaw and give them back to kill the larvae on those frames.
 

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My bad!In my thinking I thought it was addressed with the queen cells.I don't destroy queen cells unless to me they're obviously defective.A boost would fall into place to help with the population.I often mistake that most want there hive to progress or build up quicker and not waste money on a queen.My belief you get better queens that way.My bad for not questioning if he had needed resources for doing so.My resources aren't limited so I will have a tendency to over look that.I will keep that in mind from here on out so as to be an asset rather than not.Thank you Michael for stimulating that thought process.I won't argue which way is best I'm not an egotist just like helping others to the best of my ability.With out question I believe your advice would be best in this situation.It's just how I would deal with it in my AO.It is always a pleasure getting Michaels view on things.I learn ,you learn ,we all learn ,doesn't get any better then that:thumbsup:
 

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I had a situation yesterday where I had a hive at my house that was strong going into winter and I had left them plenty of stores to last the winter. When I finally (note finally ) got around to checking them I was expecting a good inspection and great things. When I took the inner cover off I discovered wax moth heaven. They had invaded the top 2 boxes and made a Mell of a Hess. I checked the bottom box and they were there but not really bad. So I did as Michael stated and compressed the hive. I took out all the frames and took the ones that were not infested and the ones that were only slightly infested and placed them in the bottom box and shook the remainder of the bees in the bottom box where the queen was. I took all the other frames and placed them in the freezer for use later. All of this infestation was my fault for not checking on them especially with them having so much space to guard. It just goes to show that anyone can make mistakes. If you do anything long enough you will make mistakes. At least I do...if you don't believe me asked my wife.
 

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Not at all Michael just explaining my logic and thanking you for stimulation a thought process for me.I'm an open minded person and do truly appreciate the stimulation.It's difficult to display emotion on the internet.If we had been speaking in person you would see I was enjoying the conversation not at all offended.We here both doing the same thing in just different manors.Such is beekeeping many different ways of doing something we all commonly love.I highly value your input and thoughts!You spoke in Columbia TN if I had been able to attend and met you, you'd see I'm an easy going appreciative individual.Sorry off topic:eek:t:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hive may be a little weak.Pull the frame put it in the freezer for a day and that should take care of it.I wouldn't stress to much about it.If it's wax moths there will be some webbing if it's hive beetles it will get slimey and have kind of a rotten citrus smell(like oranges in the garbage)Either one tells you hive is getting weak and may need a boost.
Definitely Wax Moth as Larvae are to big for beetles. I'll pull the eaten frame and any that don't have a lot of Bees on them.

It's primary problem is that it is queenless. It's next problem is not enough bees to guard the comb. I don't know what your plan is for the queenless issue, but obviously it will need to be resolved.
My plan for a new Queen is to wait a few weeks and see if the existing Queen cells produced anything.

The second issue can be resolved by compressing the hive. Remove any comb that the bees are not currently occupying and put it in the freezer. Try to reduce them down to only the number of boxes they can fill with bees. After that they will be able to remove the remaining larvae but you could still help out if it's pollen or honey (not brood) you could freeze, thaw and give them back to kill the larvae on those frames.
Going out to do that now. Thanks everyone.
 
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