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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I modified a honey super with 6 soffit vents, 2 on the sides, 1 each on the front and back. I saw the DE hive and did not want to spend the money and change everything around, so I borrowed a few ideas. I put a innercover above the deeps and another below the outer cover to create an airspace or attic above to cool the warm air before it hits the outer cover. The vents I think, provide a bit of ventilation. Inside the modified super is about 4 frames of honey, partially uncapped
for "extra food" for the spring. The bees are still working the honey and are even drawing some comb on the 2 empty frames I placed on the end. Is it ok to leave the honey in the super all winter? Do you think this airspace will help or hurt my bees. I need your opinions. Thanks in advance...


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"To bee or not to bee, that is the question"

[This message has been edited by newbee 101 (edited October 08, 2004).]
 

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>I modified a honey super with 6 soffit vents, 2 on the sides, 1 each on the front and back. I saw the DE hive and did not want to spend the money and change everything around, so I borrowed a few ideas.

The DE hive had six vents open during the summer (with the two top pieces in "summer" position) but only two are open during the winter. I have some I built that have four that are open year around. Six might be overkill.

>I put a innercover above the deeps and another below the outer cover to create an airspace or attic above to cool the warm air before it hits the outer cover.

I think the inner cover over the deeps is sufficient, but the other one won't hurt anything.

>The vents I think, provide a bit of ventilation.

Thye will. But did you screen the hole on the inner cover? If not, the bees will draw comb in this space. I would not use it without screening the hole on the inner cover that is on top of the deep. #8 hardware cloth is best, but any screen small enough to keep the bees out of the attic will do.

>Inside the modified super is about 4 frames of honey, partially uncapped
for "extra food" for the spring.

I wouldn't put them there. The bees will move up into there in the spring and make a mess since you only have four frames in there.

>The bees are still working the honey and are even drawing some comb on the 2 empty frames I placed on the end. Is it ok to leave the honey in the super all winter?

I wouldn't.

>Do you think this airspace will help or hurt my bees.

If you screen it off and if you block a few of the vents, it will work very well. Just put some duct tape over half of the vents and in the summer when the bees are starting to beard, you can uncover them all again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, Screen up the inner cover hole and close a couple vents. Can I store the honey inside my house? I dont want to eat it because I put in Apistan. Should I put back on in the spring?

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"To bee or not to bee, that is the question"
 
G

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Not to worry, the bees are very good at
propolizing any "excess" vents that they
don't like. Assuming that the bees do
not go into a cluster right away due to
cold, they may be able to do this in
a few weeks.
 

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If you leave them access to the area, which I wasn't recommanding, and if the weather is warm enough, then I would guess they will propolize all of them totally shut.

The DE system you're trying to emulate does not have acess to the vents. They do propolize the screen on the inner cover some, but since light doesn't come directly in it, they seem to not do it as much as they do a vent on the side like that.

The DE system also has the winter and summer position which blocks all the vents in the bottom vent box during the winter (leaving just two or three in the top) and opens all of them in the summer position.
 

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Hi Newbee We don't get as cold as you get but it's not the cold that harms the bee as much as the extra moister build up. they did an expermient in Minnesota raising a hive into the air with out any bottom board on it to face the winter elements. That hive came through the winter in better shape than all the other hives. that were winter on the grown. here in Oklahoma i just place twig about a 1/4" under the lid at south side so the cold north winds can't blow directly into the hive. I do this after they have about quit foraging for the year so they wont seal it shut.and keep check just in case they do.
 
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