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Hello! Over the years, I have had minor nuisance with what I've identified as masonry bees. This spring, all of a sudden, I have a lot of them. There have been between 25 and 50 flying around the sunny, south facing ,front of my house.I watched for quite awhile. They really didn't bother me. The first story of my house is brick, and the second story has vinyl siding. I finally noticed they are going into the seam between the brick and the siding. I thought masonry bees were solitary, but I've seen multiple bees entering the same space, so that's a bit confusing. Anyway, what should I do about them? I don't want to kill them, but they are becoming a worsening nuisance. My granddaughters are afraid of them. I know they are pollinators and we need them. Please help!
 

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How about using this opportunity to educate your grandchildren about our fellow inhabitants of the earth. Mason bees are marvelous creatures and only sting when forced to do so. they are great pollinators who help the development of many fruits. look at any apple tree and you will see more mason bees on it than honey bees. Call them your girls, tell your granddaughters that at this time of year only the ladies are alive, building nests so the next generation can spring forth with it's magical efforts to make the world a better place for everyone. Tell them how special you all are that they have chosen you and in doing so them to host the marvelous transformation of future bees from egg to adult. Take the fear of the unknown from their hearts and replace it with admiration for one of our Great Chief works of art. In the end they will appreciate the bees and thank you forever for the knowledge.
 

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I suggest you read about Mason bees before jumping to any conclusions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason_bee

There are probably multiple bees entering that space, because it leads to other chambers in which each bee can have it's space for their brood.

Mason bees are some of the best pollinators and are native to the Americas (unlike Honeybees which were brought from Europe). They are solitary bees, and rarely sting unless heavily provoked. They are also only active during a short period of the year, between Spring and Summer - so after a while you won't see them. Their brood however will remain in their chamber until next spring when they emerge.

I also wouldn't worry about them damaging your house. If you want to address the issue of them using that space as a home, you can manually remove the cocoons and store them; or wait until next spring once they emerge, and seal the area - though you will have a small window of opportunity to do this. Most likely the realistic alternative will be to manually clear the brood and seal it up, although if it were me I'd just let them be.

I think you are lucky to have large populations of mason bees, they are a great asset to have for fruit trees, gardens, and anything which requires cross pollination.
 

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Make several nest boxes for them , maybe they will start to fill them and lay off the house. you can move the boxes away from your house in the winter. If you seal up the cracks on your house you will seal the bees emerging next spring. Up here they are all done around june.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm guessing honey bees living in the gap between the brick and the house or yellow jackets in the same space...
Thanks Mr. Bush. These are definitely bees. They are not hornets or wasps. I know for a fact that I have mason bees elsewhere on my property because I have watched them. The bees by my house certainly look like the same bee, although it is POSSIBLE they could be honey bees. They are small (a little larger than a housefly) and furry.
 
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