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I ordered 4 hives, supers, veil, smoker, tools, feeders, and I think that is it.

Not to mention I am on the list for 4 Nucs

So Santa will be bring me my gift I hope Tuesday, I am going to wait till X-mass morning to open my gifts, maybe I might not be able to wait

Thanks for everyones help so far and just be ready for more questions

First one now, What type of paint? Water base, oil, flat, gloss, brush/roll on, spray paint?

Also just paint out side or inside also?
I will have the boxes for 5 months before I get my bees so they can air out and not stink
 

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jd ask:
First one now, What type of paint? Water base, oil, flat, gloss, brush/roll on, spray paint?
Also just paint out side or inside also?
I will have the boxes for 5 months before I get my bees so they can air out and not stink

tecumseh replies:
I use mis mixed paint (exterior) that you can buy from a home improvement store for from $1 to $4 per gallon. you can get into some fairly strange colors that way, but I don't think the girls care much.... well some of them do think 'the pink' is a bit over the top.

you only need to paint the hive bodies on the outside. I would not suggest to anyone that they paint the interiors, since the idea of the paint is to seal the wood from moisture and sunlight to maximize the hive body's life. if you really desired to get the most out of your boxs then I would think some kind of sealer/primer applied to the box cut ends of the hive bodies would be money well spent.

and oh yes, merry christmas....
 

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I use latex primer and than latex with a roller and brush. Paint the outside and where the boxes touch when stacked. Prime the box joints twice to seal them well.

The best way to paint boxes is to hang boxes on a long 2 by 4 between two chairs. Thread the 2 by 4 through the boxes and hang like a cloths line. It lets you paint all surfaces at one time with out the boxes sticking together.
 

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Miss mixed paints are a great value. Just
make sure it is a "top of the line" paint.
Paint will be by far the least expensive
part of your colonies and makes a big, big
difference on life span of the box. Even if
you have to pay retail for a great paint it
works out to be very little per box.
 

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I use mismixed paint as well, but lean towards the extior latex paints as the clean up is easier, and I don't go through near as many paint brushes.
 

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This is a topic that seems to be re-hashed each fall/winter when beekeepers get bored and start cleaning/fab-ing new equipment.

I think the final resolution that most come to is that today's latex paints are nearly as good as many old oil paints and they have the benefit of water clean up. Latex paints tend to be favored because they contain solids that block uv/ub light that damages the wood grain. The percentage of content of these solids are what make some paints better than others.

Some on this board will promote not painting at all or alternatives like brushing linseed oil or dipping in hot parafin (which gets involved).

For 4 hives, any Good Quality latex will do mighty fine (but do stay away from the cheaper stuff because it will cost just as much or more when you repaint twice as often (in fact more because your labor is worth something too).

It would be advisable to consider a good quality urathane glue (gorilla/titebond II or III) when assembling your woodenware.

[ December 14, 2006, 12:33 PM: Message edited by: NW IN Beekeeper ]
 

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So, you don't paint and your hive bodies only last say, 15 years instead of 18 years. Hive bodies alone don't cost much. By not painting you've saved the cost of the paint and the time it takes to put it on. Use the saved money for other things you will be needing that are unforseen at this early point in your hobby and then use the time you save to build things like robber screens, hive stands, screened bottom boards, solar wax melters, observation hive, the list goes on. Once you start painting, it's hard to stop because then your hive yard starts to look like MB's. :D
 

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As you can see, there are many different answers depending on your own personal preference. The range varies from "no treatment" to "exotic murals" painted on the boxes. You have all winter to work on it... just have fun.

I think everyone will agree 100% that if you decide to paint, do not paint on the inside of the boxes.
I agree that if you choose to paint and invest your time and money, then get good quality latex primer and exterior paint and do it right.
Also, as mentioned above, it is a good idea to use a good glue when assembling your boxes. I personally take it an extra step and drill holes and secure the ends with 1 1/2" decking or drywall screws rather than nails.
If you are short on time then you can probably skip a lot of these steps and do just fine. For me it was enjoyable on the first batch to do the best possible job I could while working on them over the winter. It was not a burden but a pleasure.
 

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When buying paint always get the one with the highest amount of paint solds. It covers better and last longer. Usually the guy at the paint counter will be able to recommend one. Most of the time its not the most expensive ones.

Good Luck
 

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Hello. Good luck to you in 2007 JD. regarding your bees. I hope you don't mind but I am interested in this subject to though I have only limited experience. I painted my boxes with a good grade latex [primer/final] and yet I had blistering and flakking. I used all oil the next year and that is good so far. I hope someone who have have many years experience with this will respond. Of course latex is more convienient because you can "prepare" in the "off" season without worrying about ventilation of toxic fumes. Love the BEES; enjoy BeeScource!
 

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Hello. Good luck to you in 2007 JD. regarding your bees. I hope you don't mind but I am interested in this subject to though I have only limited experience. I painted my boxes with a good grade latex [primer/final] and yet I had blistering and flakking. I used all oil the next year and that is good so far. I hope someone who have have many years experience with this will respond. Of course latex is more convienient because you can "prepare" in the "off" season without worrying about ventilation of toxic fumes. Love the BEES; enjoy BeeScource!
 

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"So, you don't paint and your hive bodies only last say, 15 years instead of 18 years."

Not where I live. Un-painted wood rots nearly instantaneously.

Keith
 

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>Not where I live. Un-painted wood rots nearly instantaneously.

I suppose then that I'm lucky to live in California, being the lazy beekeeper that I am.

I've got a good-size wood pile in the back where there are lots of painted and unpainted pieces of wood scattered about and exposed to all the elements, some for as long as the 25 years I've been here. Most of the painted boards rot at about the same rate as the un-painted pieces. Only the treated lumber remains unaffected, which of course you would never want to use for bees.
 

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Back in the 80s I used to use whatever I could get, oil, latex, whatever. Unfortunatly I can't remember which boxes got what paint and now when I have to repaint them I get a real mess if I accidently put latex paint over old oil paint. It starts peeling the first season. Now I only use latex to be safe.
 
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