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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a beekeeper with around 50 years XP come to check out my hives, to see if they were ready for winter, he was blown away, he goes all around the county checking out hives, and said these were among the best he's seen.
I've only been at it for 8 months, thanks to you guys on these forums, and some Youtube guys like Kamon Reynolds , Joe Mays , and even that Booger hill Guy :) check it out.

/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1G50rdiOK3o&t=423s
 

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Have to agree with Juhani. The colonies I saw in those videos had no where near enough bees to form a proper winter cluster in a box that size.
 

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Really? winters pretty mild, zone 7
I think they will be fine they are defiantly not strong but we have a short winter and maples bloom by feb 14 most of the time . Looks about average.We had really dry late summer and fall. As long as you treated for varroa in August and have good weight to them. Most of my hives look like yours expept they are in a single deep. I have a only a few that are packed like id like them to be
 

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All bee keeping is local, right?
I won’t see my bees for a long time and wouldn’t think about opening the hives for 6 months.
I’ll pop lids to check sugar boards, that’s it.
Brian
53 N, 115 W
Snowing hard right now.
 

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Looking at the video, I see something that all beekeepers should learn to avoid. He pulls the frames out of the box rubbing them against the side. This will occasionally roll a queen. Learn to gently ease the frames out of the box carefully avoiding rubbing against the next comb and avoiding letting the end bars touch the sides of the box.
 

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Looking at the video, I see something that all beekeepers should learn to avoid. He pulls the frames out of the box rubbing them against the side. This will occasionally roll a queen. Learn to gently ease the frames out of the box carefully avoiding rubbing against the next comb and avoiding letting the end bars touch the sides of the box.
Saw that also. Good point. I hope you have strong enough hives to survive winter. Please let us know in the spring. They would not survive my climate.
 

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You deserve some praise! It must be weird to have someone go through your colonies. I’m fiercely protective I don’t care who they are.

I’ve been working on nutrition this year to have the cluster be as large as possible going into winter. FWIW- the addition of ProSweet in the fall and protein patties have made a difference in strength and colony size.

Be sure to check out A Canadian Beekeepers Blog on YouTube. Ian is really fun to follow through the year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You deserve some praise! It must be weird to have someone go through your colonies. I’m fiercely protective I don’t care who they are.

I’ve been working on nutrition this year to have the cluster be as large as possible going into winter. FWIW- the addition of ProSweet in the fall and protein patties have made a difference in strength and colony size.

Be sure to check out A Canadian Beekeepers Blog on YouTube. Ian is really fun to follow through the year.
Yep, thanks, I am a lot slower than they were and work barehanded. I'm subscribed to about every beekeeping channel there is I think. I went through a ton of pollen patties, and hundreds of pounds of sugar, I've got 14 supers of drawn comb for next year.
 

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Looking at the video, I see something that all beekeepers should learn to avoid. He pulls the frames out of the box rubbing them against the side. This will occasionally roll a queen. Learn to gently ease the frames out of the box carefully avoiding rubbing against the next comb and avoiding letting the end bars touch the sides of the box.
Agree with that, to me, he was rough.

Although in his defence, he was forced to work the hives from the back because you have them hard up to each other. I really dislike working hives from the back.
 

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Trying to be diplomatic here so I’ll just say I didn’t attend his old school. Yes they appeared to be over fed but switching a frame of brood to the outside wall in the fall no less??
 

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it was the 7th frame on the ten framer.
Regardless, my point is bees arrange the feed in their hive in the fall as best suits their needs for the upcoming winter. The only time I ever move rearrange brood is to try to defeat a swarming impulse during a strong buildup in the spring. Oh, and if stings aren’t bothering you I wouldn’t be too concerned about developing an allergy. ��. Best of luck with your bees. You’re doing great.
 

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I don't know your locale so can't say what you need. Looked like a lot of syrup for the small cluster. Looked like possible field day with robbers and hive 2 was quite grumpy from the outset. If he's expecting to see eggs now I guess they should not be as shut down as they were. Agree with others they got pretty rough treatment. I'd suggest practicing reading the comb from the bottom of the box so you don't have to pull each one.
How much honey Do folks in your area recon you need? Good luck!
 
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