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Is there anything between the "rig" and the utility box? I see a 1x2 strip around the base of the super... just wondering what its purpose is.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Is there anything between the "rig" and the utility box? I see a 1x2 strip around the base of the super... just wondering what its purpose is.
Optional 1x2 strip is to just to keep the box in place/stop water, wind, and robbing, etc
 

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Are the roofs insulated or vented? They look to be 2-3 inches deep, curious what's inside that space.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Are the roofs insulated or vented? They look to be 2-3 inches deep, curious what's inside that space.
The hybrid roofs have a standard slab of 2 inch hard foam inside.
The very original roofs are also ventilated through the sides - there is a passage.

The last two hybrids I made, I don't even ventilate the roof anymore and instead ventilate the upper utility box.

All in all, the uni-body made from 3 medium Lang boxes will have ~2 inches of under-frame space.
That together with the air pockets and plenty of space above make this entire "winter ventilation issue" a non-issue.
Attaching a generic picture of how the Layens works in winter.
 

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Interesting... the 5 holes(multiple entrances and top cover vent have not caused excessive ventilation... aka heat loss? I see the follower boards are insulated, but the main box has to be pretty minimal insulation. I calculate enough room for up to 3/4" max frame rest/box attachment thickness. That leaves less than 3/4" for insulation. It seems to be working for you so the wall insulation must not be a significant factor as some layens plans indicate. Obviously the top insulation is to prevent condensation dripping on the cluster.
 

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I'm wondering if just some recycled bubblewrap covered in thin plywood between the frame rest/box attachment cleats would provide sufficient insulation.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I'm wondering if just some recycled bubblewrap covered in thin plywood between the frame rest/box attachment cleats would provide sufficient insulation.
Should work.
You have about 1/2 inch to work with - whatever fits should work.
I got a roll of 1/4" thick underlayment from when I finished my basement with laminated floor - that underlayment makes for a good insulating material to make 1/2" thick insulating sandwich (covered with thin plywood or particle board).
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Interesting... the 5 holes(multiple entrances and top cover vent have not caused excessive ventilation... aka heat loss?
I am not sure I follow.
What is important - there is no air drafting through the frames/cluster.
It is a box-inside-box configuration, well insulated on the top.

All in all, after several seasons I concluded, bee genetics/mite management are the "elephant in the room" to be looked at.
Whatever I am doing about the hives is fine and works.
 

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That makes alot of sense. What is the green in your diagram? I see the insulated follower boards and top insulation. Is the green more insulation?
 

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It appears by using #9 wire to hang the frames that a super fits on top just fine without interference. I'm liking how this all fits together neatly. Thanks for the info!!
62181
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
That makes alot of sense. What is the green in your diagram? I see the insulated follower boards and top insulation. Is the green more insulation?
Green - polyester blanket or similar insulator that dries out well.
So you have no wind blowing across the attic, end to end.
And yet no moisture build up.
Simple polyester blankets work great (I wish I had scrap woolen blankets to cut up, but I don't).
 

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Discussion Starter #33
It appears by using #9 wire to hang the frames that a super fits on top just fine without interference. I'm liking how this all fits together neatly. Thanks for the info!!
Indeed, that stub sticking up is really just about the same size as a top bar cross-cut.
Of course, the bees will build up some bur comb to fill the extra empty space - but that isn't really a big deal.
 

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I'm thinking about the bigger picture, the whole system if you will. My swarm traps are set up for traditional lang med frames. When a swarm starts drawing comb they obviously start drawing comb hanging down from these. Do you think these partial combs would withstand the 90 degree rotation into a long hive? Obviously they are not all this far drawn out.
62191
 

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These traps could be made to hang vertically, but that would take a fair amount of modification.
62192
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Do you think these partial combs would withstand the 90 degree rotation into a long hive?
Fresh combs heavy with honey are likely to tear.
Otherwise, should hold.
You may give a couple of wraps with painter's tape proactively there and here when turning live frames.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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I'm thinking about the bigger picture, the whole system if you will. My swarm traps are set up for traditional lang med frames. When a swarm starts drawing comb they obviously start drawing comb hanging down from these. Do you think these partial combs would withstand the 90 degree rotation into a long hive? Obviously they are not all this far drawn out. View attachment 62191
so fasten the frames with a small screw and rotate the trap.....

GG
 

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or set the medium on top of the other frames, when transferring to a "normal" hive, and let them build down. should not IMO rotate the frames 90Degrees after built unless it is feed frames they will eat the honey if needed, not sure they would brood in them.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
so fasten the frames with a small screw and rotate the trap.....

GG
Yep.
And if the cover keeps the frames tight in place already, even the screws are not required (instead - screw in the cover).
Should work just as well.
Treat the current roof like a removable wall, instead (just do something to prevent rain entering - a piece of tarp works).
 

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Discussion Starter #40
should not IMO rotate the frames 90Degrees after built unless it is feed frames they will eat the honey if needed, not sure they would brood in them.
Sure they will.
They do for me all the time.
:)

The real question is - do you prefer the Lazutin style or the modified Layens style.
Choose one and proceed.
 
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