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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:scratch: How D

Here in South Louisiana, every so often we get Hurricanes.

What are you Coastal States Beekeepers doing to secure your hives when that sort of threat materializes?

Pictures would be much appreciated:}

Thanks
 

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Put the lawn furniture in the swimming pool so that it doesn't get blown into the hives and knock them over. :)

Ed will have to provide his own 5 gallon bucket photos, but here is a pool photo ...


photo credit
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Put the lawn furniture in the swimming pool so that it doesn't get blown into the hives and knock them over. :)

Ed will have to provide his own 5 gallon bucket photos, but here is a pool photo ...


photo credit
What if you don't have a pool or 5 gallon buckets?
What then:}
Can I just move them into the spare bedroom and leave a small crack in the window to allow them to come an go as needed?

 

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havent had to do anything yet but the thought has crossed my mind. Most of my problem is not the wind.....it's the water...floods really easy here. so.....thought of adding extra height to the stand and lots of bungee cords!!!!
No I'm not bringing them in the house or garage. it's gonna be disruptfull enough to em without moving too.

we actually had a really bad windstorm blow thru last week. Ripped and tore branches from the oak trees that were 6" to 8" thick and these limbs were living limbs...nuthin dead or rotten about em. so tore the living heck out of my trees....still picking up....but the three hives...one of em 4 boxes high....still standing tall n proud!
 

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Seriously Snookie, there are lots of threads in the forum about hurricane preparedness that you can read through.

Some frequent ideas...

Put your hives up against a solid wall, such as your house or whatever, so they will have a windbreak...if you can, attach them to the wall with ratchet straps and eyebolts or whatever.

There are the dog stakes, but those can pull up pretty easy especially if the ground is soaked (as it usually is prior to storm landfall).

Rebar with a loop/hook bent into one end and the other end driven into the ground on either side of the hive and ratchet straps tightened between them to hold the hives down is another option.

Hives physically lowered to create a lower profile...super removal or maybe splitting hives...the splits could be recombined after the storm passes.

As you mentioned, you can bring hives into a sheltered area...but remember that if something "happens" that causes a major disturbance to that area and the hives are upset then you will have a lot of angry bees flying around.

Hives sitting low against a solid wall that protects against the prevailing winds (remember that the wind will change direction, though), heaving weights on top, and ratchet strapped to *solid* anchors are the basics for protection from high winds.

Then there's the storm surge that might come in.... That would mean elevating the hives above the expected surge level. Sometimes you just have to protect yourself and get out of harms way...if it looks really bad take the covers off the hives so the bees can escape out the top at least leave a substantial crack in the cover..there's been instances of hives drowning because the lower entrance was flooded before they could escape. Of course if you happen to have an old pontoon boat handy that would be a nice place to put the hives. ;)

Or you can do nothing, as many commercial beekeepers do, and take care of problems afterwards...many of them don't have problems.

Just some thoughts...

Btw, some folks might want to look here... http://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...ane-Center-Apiary-Hurricane-Preparedness-Unit

Ed
 

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Uhhh ... nice photo ... I think. :cool:
Don't forget to flip the buckets over before you attempt to fill with water. :eek:



.... as I recall, the engineer spec'ing the project didn't specify applying lids, but perhaps that should be a consideration. :p
 

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I live about 300 miles inland so I don't have hurricane to contend with, but this past spring we had 75 mph straight winds on two different occasions. I put a large rock (40 or 50 pounds) on top of each hive and all was well.
 
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