Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
How about trying some out before investing in lots of seeds. If they do well in your
local area then you can invest some more next bee season. If not then at least your money
will be use for buying sugar. Anything I have not try I will be weary of investing that much in. Farming is
like beekeeping. You never know if they will make it or not.
I bought 10 pounds to try out for that very reason and i also plan on pulling seed from some if they do well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
How about trying some out before investing in lots of seeds. If they do well in your
local area then you can invest some more next bee season. If not then at least your money
will be use for buying sugar. Anything I have not try I will be weary of investing that much in. Farming is
like beekeeping. You never know if they will make it or not.
I bought 10 pounds to try out for that very reason and i also plan on pulling seed from some if they do well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,861 Posts
No, the yellow and Hubam are not the same. One is an annual while the other on is a biannual.
I would rather have the annual for honey harvest. At 11.50 per lb x 50 lb is still too expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,861 Posts
No, the yellow and Hubam are not the same. One is an annual while the other one is a biannual.
I would rather have the annual for honey harvest. At $3 per lb x 50 lb is still too expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,404 Posts
Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Tim, I looked and looked and can't find Hubam on that website....

I am going to plant it again too, but I'm either going to plant it this fall, or much earlier next spring. I plowed most of mine under because the 2,4DB killed a good bit of it. The 1/2 acre growing in the best soil is okay so I left it. We got 5" of rain last week from the TS that came out of the Gulf and it has kicked in to high gear. It's grown about a foot in a week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
Brad, email Adam (sale & shipping) at [email protected] and ask him about the Hubam seed. I drove up there and picked up the seed (yesterday) instead of having it shipped (cheaper). Adam is a very nice guy & easy to deal with.

He said their supply of Hubam usually doesn't last long, but they had it as of yesterday......$3.25 per lb. I also picked up 50 lbs. of yellow sweet clover too.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
53,983 Posts
>Will hubam survive a light freeze?

If it's blooming, I don't know, it blooms too late for me to know. When it's coming up in the spring, yes.

> What experience have you had with this clover. Is it perennial as advertised

No. It Hubam an annual. What makes it special is that it is not a biennial.

> ...will it reseed?

If you don't mow it and you let it go to seed, yes. But in my experience the grass will crowd it out pretty quickly.

>Will it attract bees the same as yellow sweet?

It may be my soil, mine did not do as well as the regular white sweet or yellow sweet. Was never as tall nor as attractive to the bees, but it did produce some and it was attractive to the bees. It also bloomed later than the regular white sweet.

> Ready to sow but not sure how early in mid south.

That I would not know...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Forget the Hubam & go with the Silver River from Turner Seed in Tx. It is Hubam on steroids. Grows faster, is more hardy, & will produce more honey if planted properly. 30 acres produced 80 lb. average in North Tx.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
950 Posts
About clovers, I raise cattle and grow clovers.with.my grasses. Landinos are very good for coming back year after year. The bees love it. Any variety is great. Clovers.must be picked to grow on your soil type present. !!!! Perennials come back year after year, annuals will grow one season, and if let to reseed, will come back second year thin, bi annuals grow a year, and come back thin, basically skipping a season of growth, and should come back 3rd year from seed left from 1st and second year growth. I prefer white Dutch, as it's going to grow on most soil types, and comes back well each year. It slows in hot summers, and does well in spring, late fall, and late winter. Basically same as larger landings, just more persistent, with a lower growing habit. Excellent for grazing , and putting nitrogen back in the soil. Tolerates grazing, and light mowing well. And prices are really good, about 100.00 per 50 lbs. Dutch is very consistent. Bees love it just as well as the others in my fields�� !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I planted Hubam and silver clover both last fall, Planted an acre of each on the same day the hubam time came up good but did not get a singe stem of the silver to come up.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top