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I had one hive last year and ended up using a deep honey super. All the frames were drawn out and I used a capping fork to pull the caps off for extracing. So now the comb is not in "perfect" condition (i.e. cells are torn/deformed a little from capping fork). I plan on expanding to 4 hives this spring so I'm wondering what is the best use of 10 drawn out deep honey frames? Should I use them in a brood box for one of my new hives or save it for the honey flow? I'm thinking it would be better to use in one of my new brood boxes but I'm not sure if there are any issues with the torn/deformed wax cells. Will the bee quickly repair this?

Thanks,
Chris
 

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Don't think there is any 1 right answer. But I have some finally. Much of it I will use for honey supers. Some I will use to speed up the brood growth.

But I belive to get the max out of your comb, I would put 2 of my packages in 5 frame nucs or maybe all 4 in 5-frame nucs. Split the 10 frames evenly between the number of nucs you use for your packages.

These bees should jump all over them. They queen will be able to lay almost immediately. With SW to help they can quickly repair the comb and put their wax resources to making comb on the frames that have foundation or foundationless.

One thing I have found is with a new package or a swarm. Once the workers have started developing comb the queen will start laying eggs even though there is very little, if any height to the cells. The worker bees will build the walls faster than the brood develops.

So a package of bees with comb, regardless of it's damage, can be quickly used as fast as the workers can clean the cells to the queen's satisfaction.
 
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