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Hello there,

I've made couple of 5 frame nucs few weeks ago, moved them to deep boxes two weeks ago. One is doing OK, the other one is not so good -- wax moth has got into this hive.
New queens are laying more and more ,but both hives are not interested in sugar syrup. So far there is no progress with building new comb - i am using foundationless frames.
Is there a way to stimulate them to build comb?
How to get rid of the wax moth?

I would appreciate any advice -- thanks.

Infofly.
 

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I'm assuming you made these as splits off of a well established hive? Maybe you could get them to build the comb for you. Maybe try taking a frame of open comb from the parent hive and putting in the new hive, open comb so you're not stealing more brood, and replace it with a new empty frame. If the parent hive is strong and doing well, maybe they'll draw the new frame quickly, and your split gets a new frame of comb....do that a few times until they get the picture. Just a thought. Others' ideas on the moths will be more valuable, I've got nothing there.
 

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Be sure the new nuc has a vigorous young queen, lots of nurse bees and emerging brood. Nurse/house bees are the ones that secrete wax and build comb. Then, if there isn't a strong honey flow in progress, feed lots of sugar syrup.

Wax moth larva --> Certan, aka B401.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for replying.
I gave them plenty of syrop, but they ignore it. Both nucs have very young queens, just starting to lay in good numbers.
So if the nectar is still available I should just wait for them to buildup the numbers?

In regards to wax moth -- is there any natural way to remove them from the hive? I was trying to just take out parts of infected comb, but you can't get them all.

Thanks.

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You can pull the frame and stick it in the freezer overnight, but, obviously, that will kill any brood on the frame as well.
 

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So bubbarex...maybe if the frame has lots of brood you don't want to lose, put the frame above a queen excluder, let it emerge, and then remove it and freeze it?...you'd save the brood and guarantee you wouldn't get new larvae. Although you'd be leaving the moth larvae in the hive longer....but this way only removes the frame for a day and nothing to buy, which I think is nice.
 

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This won't necessarily answer your question - but my observations in Maine have been that wax production falls off drastically this time of year - Frames that would get drawn out in a week in May will go the entire rest of the season without being touched. Syrup, whatever doesn't help. I do have a June hived swarm which is drawing comb but I expect them to "quit" shortly.
 

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You need young and emerging bees to draw comb. If the bees in the nucs are older they won't draw wax even if you are feeding. Swap in a frame of capped brood and the nurse bees on it.

Also it sounds like they may do better in the 5 frame nucs. If you give them too much space they can't patrol it to keep pests out like wax moths. When the colony is in an expansion mode, give them more space.

Richard
 

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Bees will often ignore sugar water if there is a natural source of nectar available even if its' a weak source. There is a annual cycle to comb building and unfortunately for you this is not a good time. When the fall flowers in your area start to bloom your bees may start building comb. If not, you'll be stuck until spring.
 
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