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Hello,

Nice to see this forums. I want to open my knowledge about bee honey. On my country, some seller sale bee honey mixed with Sugar or another things. How could we know that it is original bee honey or mixed?
 

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As a consumer it is not too easily done. It takes lab testing. However, as a beekeeper, you can be sure by not feeding sugar at the same time the bees are bringing in nectar. To me that means that the feeders come off well before the honey supers go on.

But I am sure others on here can give you a much more precise answer than I can.

HTH

Rusty
 

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Welcome, the best policy for buying honey is to know the beekeeper. Unfortunately, it is difficult for anyone without a laboratory to know what is in a sweet liquid as there are many types of sugars that could be added. I think what food scientist look for is the presence of pollen and other biomarkers. Sorry I couldn't be of more help, maybe someone more knowledgeable will respond.
 

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Did you all not see where the OP is from? The USDA rules and measures are not always followed there. It is more common for retail merchants to cut honey than for beekeepers to sell pure honey.
 

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I think Rusty has universally sound advice no matter what country it's in, As a consumer the only way to really tell is to know and TRUST the beekeeper you get it from.
 

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To improve the odds, but comb honey and nothing that is already bottled. You cannot tell if the hives were being fed sugar water at the time the comb was sealed but at least you know the processor did not add something to what was bottled.
 

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Was walking thru a dollar general and seen honey on the shelf so took closer look and it said "Honey Blend" It was from Vietnam or India can't remember. So that might be what your asking about. I know I wouldnt buy it. I'd go straight to the beekeeper!
 

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I am sorry, but I do not believe any part of the tests suggested on rvbees.com. It is not that simple.

ISCIRA is currently a test which compares the Carbon isotope ratios between the carbohydrate and protein factions, and is used by the State of Wisconsin in their honey definition.

To the OP, price is usually your best clue. The cheap stuff usually is rice syrup from your neighbor to the north.

Crazy Roland
 
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