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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my hives died with a Nosema count of 29.6 million spores per bee. I read that heating the equipment to 120 degrees F would kill the spores so the equipment can be reused. Does anyone have a design for something that will heat to 120 degrees and hold the components of a double deep hive?
I saw a post by Honey Run Apiaries for a Honey Warmer that is made out of a chest type freezer.
Any other ideas?
Thanks
 

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I read that freezing greatly reduced Nosema ceranae spores but had no effect on Nosema apis. I want to say it was an ABJ article in the last year?? Where did you read that heating impacted spores and which species of Nosema were they talking about?
 

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you can use your kitchen oven to treat one box at a time to 120 degrees. i dont know that i would be willing to go this far. these spores are so widespread now in the wild as to be nearly universal. melting the wax and "washing" the woodware with propane torch would be all the treatment i would give a hive. good luck,mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I read that freezing greatly reduced Nosema ceranae spores but had no effect on Nosema apis. I want to say it was an ABJ article in the last year?? Where did you read that heating impacted spores and which species of Nosema were they talking about?
I got that from "The Beekeeper's Handbook" by Diana Sammataro and Alphonse Avitabile.
The other option is to fumigate with 80% acetic acid. But, I would prefer not having to deal with that process.
It appears that the book only deals with nosema apis.
Ernie
 

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Is there any merit to creating a water and bleach solution and washing the hive bodies and equipment down? You could use a hand sprayer with the bleach and water solution.

I'm just thinking out loud here, considering it like other forms of mold and bacteria.

Any thoughts on how affective this might be?
 

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M Wilard is right, the use of 10% bleach water sprayed on and in the bee hive will kill Nosema spores. We take each year and spray all of our nucs down and pressure wash each hive with it before we set up for the new season. This mix has been shown through studies to be a very effective way to kill Nosema spores.
 

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If you're looking for a way to heat equipment, or wax, or keep something warm... build your own oven!

http://forum.caswellplating.com/oven-building-forum/

Lots of guys on that forum are building high-temp ovens for curing plated/coated materials. Apply the same principal to your own oven, but at a lower temp.

An old freezer shell can work... IF the interior is steel-lined, not plastic.

The old beekeeper who I bought my equipment from has a large insulated box with a removable front panel. Thermostat controller on the outside with a remote probe inside the box. Uses a 220v stove element to heat the box. We clean our cappings in it; kitchen strainer with filter media (papertowel), filled with cappings, placed over a pan. Close it all up, turn on the thermostat to the appropriate temp ~150F, and let it run for 12 hours or so.

If I built it, I'd do a few things differently... steel studs, better insulation, fan to move air around to provide a more even heating.
 

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Is there any merit to creating a water and bleach solution and washing the hive bodies and equipment down? You could use a hand sprayer with the bleach and water solution.

I'm just thinking out loud here, considering it like other forms of mold and bacteria.

Any thoughts on how affective this might be?
A good 10% bleach will help. 1 Bleach : 9 parts water.
You might want to check out the melting point of bees wax.
Ernie
 
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