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I have a super defensive hive. Almost impossible to work. Tonight I ventured in for a check. Opening the top a bunch of earwigs feel out. They were also on the inside cover. I am guessing this may be a major reason for their ultra defensive behavior.

how do you get rid of earwigs?
 

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Small Cell Nucs
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I have a super defensive hive. Almost impossible to work. Tonight I ventured in for a check. Opening the top a bunch of earwigs feel out. They were also on the inside cover. I am guessing this may be a major reason for their ultra defensive behavior.

how do you get rid of earwigs?
I had to stop using inner covers because of them and ants. Main thing though is if they build comb to your lid, you have to break the seal by moving it sideways instead of straight up , because you will lift some frames up if they are attached too tight. Then when they break free from your lid, the frames fall pretty hard and its not good. :)
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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I use a vented inner cover, nothing coming in or out besides air. Then again I am way on down here in Texas.
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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It’s been relatively cool here, as it is usually about 104, this time of year, but this cold front has us at 93-99 fairly constant. August is normally pretty dang hot so we will see. You could always build a partial vented inner with maybe 2” screened vent gap just in the rear, the rest solid. Switch it out in winter, when you don’t have to worry about earwigs, etc.
 

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I use a vented inner cover, nothing coming in or out besides air. Then again I am way on down here in Texas.
Maybe it’s also a matter of where your hives are. In some regions, there are a lot of pests, while in others there are not so many of them and they do not flood the hives.
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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Maybe it’s also a matter of where your hives are. In some regions, there are a lot of pests, while in others there are not so many of them and they do not flood the hives.
I’ve acknowledged that, in a previous statement in this area, SHB, fire ants, wax moth, and yellow jackets are my main problems in the insect world. Unless I include AHB, we have earwigs but I’ve really never paid them any mind, so had no idea that they eat varroa.
The only effect earwigs have on a colony is their propensity to feast on any vorroa crawling about. You just don't like ugly harmless bugs even if they do you favors!
Very interesting Vance, I learned something new today. Thanks
Cody
 

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The only effect earwigs have on a colony is their propensity to feast on any vorroa crawling about. You just don't like ugly harmless bugs even if they do you favors!
Vance, would you point me in the direction of a read on this. I have earwigs (lots) and my bees are super calm, so I agree with the rest that they're not the reason for the defensive behavior. And although I dislike them, I didn't realize I should be thankful. Thanks in advance.
 

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This is all found on earwigs, and from the sounds of it they are as much a pain as they would be any benefit to hive. 🤔
 
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