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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I did get a "Bug Bite Thing Suction Tool" (or my wife got it for me) and I can say it works. It has a scraper to get the stinger out, and a suction thing to pull the venom out. Even works for regular bug bites if you get to them soon enough.
Any chance you could post the brand name or a link where I might find that tool?
 

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the goatskin gloves to the protective equipment used when doing treatments.
Vinyl is fine; they work.

I do NOT recommend leather gloves for treatment work.
They will soak/absorb in chems (and you may not even notice) - but later you may notice chem damage on your hands.
Ask me how I know.
OA is a good example.

Must have vinyl to handle the chems.
 

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I would recommend leather for pulling the rubber caps out of the vaporizer, at 400 F it will burn your fingers and any OA left in the cup, if it splashes out it will stick and burn.

Ask me how I know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Vinyl is fine; they work.

I do NOT recommend leather gloves for treatment work.
They will soak/absorb in chems (and you may not even notice) - but later you may notice chem damage on your hands.
Ask me how I know.
OA is a good example.

Must have vinyl to handle the chems.
Thank you so much for saving me from doing something stupid! I'll find some other use for the leather ones.
I would recommend leather for pulling the rubber caps out of the vaporizer, at 400 F it will burn your fingers and any OA left in the cup, if it splashes out it will stick and burn.

Ask me how I know!
I haven't yet even taken my vaporizer out of the box, so I don't know anything about the rubber caps. However, I'd probably let the vaporizer cool off before handling the business end. I'll be finding out about all that soon, as I'm planning a series of OAV treatments just as soon as I can find the queen and get her behind an excluder. She's being very shy lately.
 

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My gloves are canvas and I got them from Miller Bee. The dexterity isn't great but I don't injure many bees. I wash them with ivory soap or something else non scented. So far, none have gotten through them.
 

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I don't use my leather gloves much-- only when I have a real upset hive and I don't think they have stung me through them. But I have had to clean propolis off of other stuff.

Denatured alcohol or "fuel alcohol" comprised of ethanol readily dissolves propolis off of clothes, countertops, hive tools, and other hand tools. You don't want to get that all over your hands though because it is denatured with usually methanol which can cause blindness or death if too much is absorbed through your skin at one time.

If you are concerned about fuel alcohol not being food grade, everclear and golden grain are two brands of 95% ethanol that you can buy in a liquor store (depending on your local laws) and will dissolve propolis. Vodka or any other spirits at 40% alcohol or less might work too, but I haven't tried it.

I use extended cuff nitrile gloves that go farther up your wrist and are 14mil at the finger tips. I change them out each trip to my hives-- I tried re-useable gloves, but they get nasty smelling so I'll shell out an extra $ to have clean gloves. The bees can sting through them, but they usually don't and it seems that they only have about a 50% success rate of actually making it through the glove when they try. I mainly use the nitrile gloves because I don't want to have to clean the propolis off of my hands or out from under my nails.
 

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I rarely wear leather gloves as it seems the bees don't like leather much and I like the dexterity of nitrile gloves. I get stung as much as most but not when wearing nitrile gloves. Watch how fast you move your hands, slow deliberate movements help.
 

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I use extended cuff nitrile gloves that go farther up your wrist and are 14mil at the finger tips.
Thanks for that recommendation - grabbed some off Amazon to try out this weekend.
 

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After getting stung on my hands one too many times, I decided to switch to leather beekeeping gloves instead of the nitrile gloves I had been using. The first time I wore the leather gloves, they became covered in propolis so that the fingers stick together and make handling frames difficult. I've tried bleach, vinegar, laundry detergent, dishwashing liquid and probably some other things I forgot, but nothing takes the propolis off. Has anyone found something that actually gets gloves clean?



Your thoughts or suggestions?
I use 9 mil nitrile gloves. They are very durable and do not tear easily so I can re-use them many times. Yes the bees can sting through them, but the stinger does not fully penetrate, so I immediately pull the portion of the glove with the stinger up and let it snap back and that pulls the stinger tip out of my skin. The stings are barely noticeable.
 

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Has anyone found something that actually gets gloves clean?

Today, I got stung through the leather gloves AND through the disposable food service gloves I wore over the leather ones to try and protect the leather from propolis. There's hardly any manual dexterity at all when wearing those big, bulky gloves, so I ended up squishing a bee under my finger and couldn't even feel it until it stung me. So why bother with those leather gloves anyway? They don't actually protect against stings, and they even cause stinging by preventing me from feeling when there's a bee right under my finger.

Your thoughts or suggestions?
I wash mine, hang to dry, and if really stiff, rub saddle soap into them. Also it depends on where you get your gloves, the ones from the feed store I had to wear nitrile gloves inside. The ones from Dadant, I have not had a stinger get thru. Feed store gloves are pretty much a waste of money, made in China?
 
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The real question is maybe - why do you get stung in the first place?
Not how to clean the gloves.
:)
My thoughts exactly. Stings are rare in our bee yard, but sometimes (most times?) its just the beekeepers lack of technique, not the gloves or the bees or anything else we might blame for stings.

While we only use gloves occasionally, they are very old and quite stiff when we put them on, but loosen up after wearing for a little bit.
 

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I mean, that works - but you will have a hard time creating suction with it. :)

I found another use for it as well. One of the student's children got a sting. They were so interested in the sucker tool that they forgot all about crying and happily applied suction to their "owie."
 

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After getting stung on my hands one too many times, I decided to switch to leather beekeeping gloves instead of the nitrile gloves I had been using. The first time I wore the leather gloves, they became covered in propolis so that the fingers stick together and make handling frames difficult. I've tried bleach, vinegar, laundry detergent, dishwashing liquid and probably some other things I forgot, but nothing takes the propolis off. Has anyone found something that actually gets gloves clean?

Today, I got stung through the leather gloves AND through the disposable food service gloves I wore over the leather ones to try and protect the leather from propolis. There's hardly any manual dexterity at all when wearing those big, bulky gloves, so I ended up squishing a bee under my finger and couldn't even feel it until it stung me. So why bother with those leather gloves anyway? They don't actually protect against stings, and they even cause stinging by preventing me from feeling when there's a bee right under my finger.

Your thoughts or suggestions?
Hello. I use regular bee keeping gloves and nitrile gloves over the top and throw them out when they get grubby. It’s a bit bulky but it keeps the leather part of the gloves clean and then all I do is hand wash the fabric part.
 

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After getting stung on my hands one too many times, I decided to switch to leather beekeeping gloves instead of the nitrile gloves I had been using. The first time I wore the leather gloves, they became covered in propolis so that the fingers stick together and make handling frames difficult. I've tried bleach, vinegar, laundry detergent, dishwashing liquid and probably some other things I forgot, but nothing takes the propolis off. Has anyone found something that actually gets gloves clean?

Today, I got stung through the leather gloves AND through the disposable food service gloves I wore over the leather ones to try and protect the leather from propolis. There's hardly any manual dexterity at all when wearing those big, bulky gloves, so I ended up squishing a bee under my finger and couldn't even feel it until it stung me. So why bother with those leather gloves anyway? They don't actually protect against stings, and they even cause stinging by preventing me from feeling when there's a bee right under my finger.

Your thoughts or suggestions?
Try this, just put them in the freezer for an hour then take out and the propolis will crack and flake off.
 
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