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Discussion Starter #1
Mine will be 6 years old this year. I've never requeened, never treated it. The original queen is a bweaver. I'm sure they have swarmed a few times and or superceded the queen at some point. They are my best producers every year and have always been very gentle. I checked on them this past weekend and they were flying all around and bring in pollen getting ready for year #6. I have another one turning 5yrs old and 2 turning 4 this year.
 

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I have one whose first year was 2000. The queen was a daughter of a Webster queen. Obviously the colony has changed their queen several time, but their production has stayed high most years...so why re-queen. Last three years...135, 135, 110 lb. of honey. Average colony production those years was 55, 108, 50.
 

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I got a NWC from honeyrun that is marked and this will be her 5th season also treatment free. i just cant bring myself to killing her or requeening them. i also have some beeweavers that are doing well it been cold here single digits and the are doing well.
 

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I have a 4 1/2 year old from a Zia Queen. Still have her. No real treatments either.
 

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I have one whose first year was 2000. The queen was a daughter of a Webster queen. Obviously the colony has changed their queen several time, but their production has stayed high most years...so why re-queen. Last three years...135, 135, 110 lb. of honey. Average colony production those years was 55, 108, 50.
Do you raise queens from that hive?
Do they perform as good?
 

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They're supposed to die when they are two right? We must be doing something wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hambone. Say something profound for your 5000th post. :applause:
6 years ago I was looking around for some info on TBH on the internet, when I stumbled upon the Beesource Forum, and nothing as been the same since… So, I sit here and ponder about what to write for my 5000th post. Should I write a post about all the great people I have met? Perhaps speak of the many great items I have bought through the BS and BS members? Maybe just a stupid joke in the joke section will do? I can’t think of just a single thing to write about. SO I will write about my six years on the BS and that which it has brought me.

I recall the early years of the BS, Back when you would wait for HOURS just to MAYBE get a response to a question about the bee question you had. It was just a few guys that regularly posted. My, oh my, how things have changed, from a handful of topics, to the vast sections of topics we have today. Growing from the few hundred of members we had back them, to the over 14,000 strong that we have today. The few posts a day have been replaced by hundreds of posts per day. Our little BS is all growds up.

Most websites that you go to have sponsors, it is how they make money on the interwebs. Usually those sponsors are faceless, nameless people that have no idea who their customers are; much less know what the customers need, but not here on the Beesource. The great sponsors that help make the BS possible, are also great members that contribute more than just money, they contribute to every part of the BS. Also, if you ever have any issues, or questions they are just a PM away. The sponsors are more than just companies, they are people that truly know their customers and the needs that they have.

I believe that one of the reasons for the Beesource's success is the members themselves, a great many of whom I have had the honor of talking with. So many different personalities are the thing which makes the BS such a great place to call home. Learning about different people’s ideas on things. I do not always agree with everyone, but I appreciate their different points of view on things. The members are the things that are unique to the BS that make it go. The new members, as well as old members, meshing together to form a giant ball of gooey fun and banter helps to makes BS unique.

To answer the eternal question….”Do I have a life?” …..Well, I would like to think so , yes. Next question.

Finally, I would like to thank Barry for having the GENIUS to create such a great resource/digital playground for the Beekeepers in the US and around the world. Without Barry there would not be any Beesource, what I use as my internet water cooler, for me to keep up with current events. I think that the way that Barry set up the BS to succeed from day one has everything to do with it. So I want thank him for Beesource, and all that he has done for the members and me. I can only hope that the next six years are as fun as the first!
 

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My original hive came from a cutout, it will be 8 years old this June. The current queen is a daughter of the original that is now in her 4th year.
 

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My oldest is 3years old. I figured that older queens would not be as productive but Mr . Palmer has once again got me interested. Hmmm...
 

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My oldest hive is only a little over a year old, but since I've only been a Beek for that same amount of time, I'll count it as a win for now. :thumbsup:

I absolutely LOVE this thread, as a new Beek, it's so good to hear some big time success stories. To me, that's been one of the frustrating things about trying to learn the hobby. While I realize the diseases, pest, and challenges that threaten bees are real and must be dealt with...It's depressing to go to a local, state or national meeting or conference and hear non-stop how your bees are going to die...especially if you dare have the audacity to think you can do it TF.

Nice thread Hambone! :applause:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Moots. I've never been to a bee meeting since I don't have a club close to me or spent the money to go to a conference. I've just always done it my way and the bees way. I've done some EO feeding and a sugar dust once, but I've just said screw it. I'm going to keep it as easy as possible over the past few years. Pollen patties and 5:3 mix is all I give and I get great returns. I am lowering the Ph of my water this year in the 5:3 mix to try something new, but over all I just let them bee. Leave enough winter honey and they have been good. I checked 10 hives last weekend and I only lost one. Of the 10, 7 are over 3yrs old, 3 are 1 and I lost one of the 1yr olds.
 

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This is going to sound crazy within the context of this thread. I was taught to replace queens in late summer - any who had already been through an intensive brood build up such as the previous spring.

The reason being that young vigorous queens build up better for winter, better the next spring, and are less likely to die or fail over the winter when it is fatal for the colony. If a hive requires requeening in the spring by the time the diagnosis is made and a new queen is procured and starts laying it is too late for that hive to build up and make a honey crop during our one short early honey flow.

So, other than stand outs that I want to graft from - I mostly requeen in late summer. My oldest queens are about a year and a half old.
 

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I, too, am thrilled to see this thread as the depressing "your bees are going to die" drumbeat leaves me non-plussed.

My hives and my own beekeeping experience are exactly the same age: seven months, seven days and oddly enough, a bit more than seven hours. I count it from the moment the last participant in bee cut-out workshop departed my farm leaving me and my three semi-hived, recently cut-out, swarms of bees eying each other warily.

They've been trying to train me ever since, and I've been trying to figure them out ever since. No party is claiming success, yet.

It put chills in my bones every time I read how common it is for first year beekeepers to lose some or all of their hives. I am determined to see mine through. If they last as long as some have reported, I will be thrilled. Three, four, eight, thirteen years is so comforting to hope for.

Enj.
 

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Enj - beekeepers lose bees for all kinds of reasons, but an awful lot of new beekeepers lose bees because they don't get involved. They never really start keeping bees. They don't do inspections when they need to, or they "hope it will fix itself" when they think something is wrong. They underfeed and let them starve, or they overfeed and make them swarm. They think everything is fine until they see no hive activity, and then say wax moths killed their hive.

The point is that a lot of it is preventable, but you have to keep bees to prevent it. Or you won't even have bees. If you do your part you are a lot likelier to be successful than the numbers might suggest.
 

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I have a 3 year old jet black mutt queen with rust colored racing stripes down both sides of her abdomen and seven 2 year old queens all of which are laying well. I should say they were laying well as of last year.
 
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