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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
new beekeeper here, picking up my first ever package in ~3 weeks. I bought an 'in hive' feeder from mann lake (takes up about 2 frames, and is about half the depth of a deep hive...most are probably familiar with this feeder, it's black and has 'funnels' that the bees walk down into). How much should I give the bees? Fill it up once with a 1:1 solution and that's it? When they get through that, take it out, add frames back in it's place, and the bees are ready to fend for themselves?

EDIT: I think I found the 'general' answer: https://carolinahoneybees.com/how-to-feed-a-new-package-of-bees-keys-to-success/

Sounds like I need to keep feeding them (or at least 'offering' food to them) until they have established their brood boxes. So that could be the entire first summer.
 

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Yes, feed, feed, feed. The frame feeders don't hold enough for my taste. I like to only refill the feeders once a week. When I was starting packages they would take 3 or more gallons of heavy 2:1 syrup a week from a hive top feeder. There isn't much difference in comb production between light and heavy syrup. But, the heavy syrup doesn't spoil as easy and gives the bees more sugar per fill up.
 

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Being shallower feeder, the bees may make comb on the bottom, and raise brood. Other than that, I would not worry about removing it during the season. I put my feeder at the outside wall of the box, and only filled it once as it was a gallon capacity.
 

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6a 4th yr 7 colonies inc. resource hive
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new beekeeper here, picking up my first ever package in ~3 weeks. I bought an 'in hive' feeder from mann lake (takes up about 2 frames, and is about half the depth of a deep hive...most are probably familiar with this feeder, it's black and has 'funnels' that the bees walk down into). How much should I give the bees? Fill it up once with a 1:1 solution and that's it? When they get through that, take it out, add frames back in it's place, and the bees are ready to fend for themselves?

EDIT: I think I found the 'general' answer: https://carolinahoneybees.com/how-to-feed-a-new-package-of-bees-keys-to-success/
One of the best video's to date on feeding a new colony can be found on YouTube from the University of Guelph. They recommend feeding enough to build out comb in all of the frames in the brood box. In the video Paul Kelley put on a large hive top feeder and continues to feed it until he's satisfied with how much they have built out. He also repositions the frames at certain intervals. It could be 3-4 gallons. Yes, gallons. If you don't feed enough, you run the risk of them abandoning the outermost frames leaving them at a disadvantage in winter. If you feed too much you run the risk of making the colony honey bound (queen has no place to lay her eggs). The video is called Comb Building. Highly recommended. It made the difference in my beekeeping last year. Good luck. Remember to have fun.
 

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I would keep the feeder on the outside. You may also have problems with burr comb on the bottom of the feeder since it does not completely fill the box. I would plan on filling the feeder twice a week and move it up when you add boxes to make it easier to fill.
 

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new beekeeper here, picking up my first ever package in ~3 weeks. I bought an 'in hive' feeder from mann lake (takes up about 2 frames, and is about half the depth of a deep hive...most are probably familiar with this feeder, it's black and has 'funnels' that the bees walk down into). How much should I give the bees? Fill it up once with a 1:1 solution and that's it? When they get through that, take it out, add frames back in it's place, and the bees are ready to fend for themselves?

EDIT: I think I found the 'general' answer: https://carolinahoneybees.com/how-to-feed-a-new-package-of-bees-keys-to-success/
One of the best video's to date on feeding a new colony can be found on YouTube from the University of Guelph. They recommend feeding enough to build out comb in all of the frames in the brood box. In the video Paul Kelley put on a large hive top feeder and continues to feed it until he's satisfied with how much they have built out. He also repositions the frames at certain intervals. It could be 3-4 gallons. Yes, gallons. If you don't feed enough, you run the risk of them abandoning the outermost frames leaving them at a disadvantage in winter. If you feed too much you run the risk of making the colony honey bound (queen has no place to lay her eggs). The video is called Comb Building. Highly recommended. It made the difference in my beekeeping last year. Good luck. Remember to have fun.
I really like how they do this and Also the inside Feeder !
 

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I have been accused of feeding my bees too much. Hhhmmm, my bees make it through the winter and my nucs build up quickly. I recommend feeding and frame manipulation to get the comb drawn out as soon as possible. Nucs, packages, and swarms tend to be wax making machines. Take advantage of this while you can. It’s too late to build wax at the end of the season.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thx to all above. I ended up installing a hive top feeder. Yeah, very convenient. Holds 3 gallons and I can add to it without opening the hive....
 
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