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3rd year new beekeeper. 5 Lang Hives, 8F Deep brood chambers, medium honey supers.

I was checking one of my hives today. In the bottom brood chamber, I found 4 full frames worth of pollen( 3 Full frames and 2 Frame half pollen & half brood. In the two brood chambers combines, there are 7 frames of capped brood/eggs/larva, 4-5 Frames of pollen , 3F capped honey ( there is one frame they drew crazy comb in some part and left the rest alone)

Q is Do I need to remove some of the pollen frame to give more room?
- If yes, what do I do with the extra frame of pollen.

Thanks in advance for all the help
 

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4 frames is most i've seen in 1 hive. Usually at peak. They will consume the pollen as it dries up. Pollen frames are good for hives raising queens.
 

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I´ve seen 10 full frame medium box under the brood chambers and in the brood chamber.
Check the picture in my Hi post. I am on 44˙N and here we have some cold days in the spring.

Thay use polen fermentation as a heat source and for food.
You have to much because you´re in Florida. If that is status in all your hive you have to remove one by one and add frame to build untill 3 pollen frame left.
Extra pollen frame save in a depp box and add above honey super when time is come. When they close comb that is storage condition. That way you can store pollen for boosting new nucs, for spring managment, for winter store(if you go north) etc...

Prepare your favorite equipment and at the of the year you´ll have 10-15 Lang Hives.

But winwin situation is if you have 8F Deep box for expanding brood nest in 3 brood box. Later you can take full box for nuc.
You are new as I am.
You´ll know what to do.

If you don´t manage with that much pollen they could swarm when reach some bees strenght.
If they have pollen, nectar flow, bees and all that in the hive... !!!

Wish you manage good
 

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Thank you all. I am going to leave the pollen alone for now. May be give some space if they start to put more honey in the brood box.
 

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Q is Do I need to remove some of the pollen frame to give more room?
- If yes, what do I do with the extra frame of pollen.
Leave it be. "Bees make better beekeepers than beekeepers make bees." Michael Palmer
In other words, your bees know what they are doing and you should trust them.
 

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I like what's been said so far. I had something similar happen with my hive last year. It was my first year and I only had the one. The bees stored so much pollen that the queen didn't have much room to lay. I posted about being pollen bound and the advice I got was this: "Pollen is really good" "It makes healthy bees" "The bees know what they are doing" "They'll winter really nice" etc. All good advice! Someone suggested swapping a frame or two of the loaded pollen frames with empty, but drawn comb- frames to provide immediate space. Being brand new I didn't have anything extra like that. My queen swarmed with a fraction of the hive, but I saw a couple queen cells. After the proper amount of time, I eventually saw eggs again and the new queen working away.

I somehow feel it was my fault though. Maybe it was the timing of when I swapped the deeps, top to bottom.

Good luck! I hope it works out!
 

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I like what's been said so far. I had something similar happen with my hive last year. It was my first year and I only had the one. The bees stored so much pollen that the queen didn't have much room to lay. I posted about being pollen bound and the advice I got was this: "Pollen is really good" "It makes healthy bees" "The bees know what they are doing" "They'll winter really nice" etc. All good advice! Someone suggested swapping a frame or two of the loaded pollen frames with empty, but drawn comb- frames to provide immediate space. Being brand new I didn't have anything extra like that. My queen swarmed with a fraction of the hive, but I saw a couple queen cells. After the proper amount of time, I eventually saw eggs again and the new queen working away.

I somehow feel it was my fault though. Maybe it was the timing of when I swapped the deeps, top to bottom.

Good luck! I hope it works out!
 

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>Someone suggested swapping a frame or two of the loaded pollen frames with empty, but drawn comb- frames to provide immediate space. Being brand new I didn't have anything extra like that.

Actually if you use empty but drawn comb in the brood nest to open it up, the bees quickly fill it with nectar. If you use empty frames the bees start to draw comb and, as soon as it is started but not deep enough to put nectar in, the queen lays in it. The outcome is entirely different and for swarm control empty drawn comb does not come close to being as effective. This has been observed by Heddon, and Hutchinson when they were doing comb honey with shaken swarms. Hutchinson was fond of foundationless for such things while Heddon liked foundation (but not drawn). You had everything you needed.

>I somehow feel it was my fault though.

I'm not saying that sometimes you can't reduce swarming, but in the end I don't think swarming is so much "fault" as the instinct of successful bees. So while on the one hand you did not manage to stop them from swarming you did manage them in a way that they were successful enough to swarm. That is a sign you are doing something right.
 
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