Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
I leave my bees with about 90 Pounds of honey to overwinter. And take about 110 to 130 pounds annually per hive. My average would be 210 pounds per year, Mixed breed Russian, Italian and some Mutt. North west Pennsylvania.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
I am in the process of compiling data for a report. I understand the difference between surplus honey and overwinter honey. What I want to know is how much honey the Average hive makes during a year.

Now I understand that it can vary by latitude, and even region. I know it can vary from year to year. But I am looking for an average for your hives, Where you are, And the breed of bees you have.

This is for research and I would really appreciate not having to filter through Advice, logistics or antidotal information.

Thank you all very much.
When asking beekeepers for Advice there is no known antidote. :)

Alex
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Unless you break the reporting data down, there is no point to your request. Averages are meaningless. Compare my data with that of I'llbeedan. In a good year with a strong hive, I can harvest around 35# per hive and leave the bees with about 15-30# in the brood chambers. And I will need to feed sugar to make up for the harvested honey. Some hives put all the honey in the brood nest and I won't be able to harvest any from them.

My bes are Carni/Caucasian mutts and they do a great job on our extremely short flow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,307 Posts
Unless you break the reporting data down, there is no point to your request. Averages are meaningless. Compare my data with that of I'llbeedan. In a good year with a strong hive, I can harvest around 35# per hive and leave the bees with about 15-30# in the brood chambers. And I will need to feed sugar to make up for the harvested honey. Some hives put all the honey in the brood nest and I won't be able to harvest any from them.

My bes are Carni/Caucasian mutts and they do a great job on our extremely short flow.
Ah, the truth is refreshing. JW's report is much closer, although a bit higher, than mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
This is Why I have been a member here for 4 1/2 years and never post. I find it more amusing to just read the STUPID COMMENTS you wipes make.
It is always interesting to note who is offended by an attempt at humor. I noticed your comment was edited by a moderator I can guess what the word was that was removed. Did you not see the smiley face?

It shouldn't be hard to remember not to post in your threads in the future.

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,086 Posts
really tough question to answer so many variables involved.
My best hive over the last 3 years has given me 80lbs + ( at least 2 medium supers of capped honey)
I have had hives produce 2 deeps and a medium of capped honey but this is not typical nor is it every year.

I would say conservatively in the 60lbs range per hive is probably where my answer would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
This is Why I have been a member here for 4 1/2 years and never post. I find it more amusing to just read the STUPID COMMENTS you wipes make.
And yet you posted this garbage. 3 total posts in 4 years and this is one of them. I've learned a lot from many of the "wipes" here and have taken nothing away from your contributions, or lack there of.

Thanks for nothing.
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Must be a slow day, and not a very nice one, in the apiary. Anyone that has been keeping bees for any length of time knows that different areas of the country have vastly different per hive yields. Those of us that are happy to get 35-40# per hive typically do not have anything to brag about. Tim's response indicated that he he glad he was not the only one getting less than stellar yields and that someone, me, would admit to it. If I was getting over 100#, it would be a different story. I am happy for those that routinely get above that and would never question their numbers. Now if someone were to claim in excess of 300#, I might question the accuracy of their scale...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And yet you posted this garbage. 3 total posts in 4 years and this is one of them. I've learned a lot from many of the "wipes" here and have taken nothing away from your contributions, or lack there of.

Thanks for nothing.
Yet you bothered to post. You could not respond to the simple original query. but could find the time to respond once it became a controversy. Good for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I am in the same situation withJW Palmer. The weather here has been horrible and I really question if I will get one super per hive. Then of course there is the issue of swarming and other problems. During good "normal" years I get about 2 supers, but this year is probably going to be the worst year in the past 9 years. The bees will not venture out given cold and rain. I wish I was in part of the US that normally produced high quantities, but that i snot the case.

Must be a slow day, and not a very nice one, in the apiary. Anyone that has been keeping bees for any length of time knows that different areas of the country have vastly different per hive yields. Those of us that are happy to get 35-40# per hive typically do not have anything to brag about. Tim's response indicated that he he glad he was not the only one getting less than stellar yields and that someone, me, would admit to it. If I was getting over 100#, it would be a different story. I am happy for those that routinely get above that and would never question their numbers. Now if someone were to claim in excess of 300#, I might question the accuracy of their scale...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
"This is for research and I would really appreciate not having to filter through Advice, logistics or antidotal information."

"This is Why I have been a member here for 4 1/2 years and never post. I find it more amusing to just read the STUPID COMMENTS you ***wipes make."

"Thank You! I did not ask for humor. in fact I specifically asked for strait answers without drivel."


Hmmmm....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
864 Posts
>Yet you bothered to post. You could not respond to the simple original query. but could find the time to respond once it became a controversy. Good for you!

Well, the original post on my end was, "!!". I saw the original unedited post because someone quoted it. I read through all the posts to make sure that what I may have had to add wasn't already covered. Then I came across this "This is Why I have been a member here for 4 1/2 years and never post. I find it more amusing to just read the STUPID COMMENTS you wipes make."

I took offense to that. You come here and contribute nothing, then ask a question then insult the same very people that want to help.

Also, who made this into a controversy? Did you expect no responses at all to your comment? As far as me calling you out on what i believe to be an unnecessary post, I take this forum pretty seriously, and a lot of valuable members with a lot to offer are getting fed up with this type of activity and leaving. Sorry if I ruffled your feathers, but you ruffled mine first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Must be a slow day, and not a very nice one, in the apiary. Anyone that has been keeping bees for any length of time knows that different areas of the country have vastly different per hive yields. Those of us that are happy to get 35-40# per hive typically do not have anything to brag about. Tim's response indicated that he he glad he was not the only one getting less than stellar yields and that someone, me, would admit to it. If I was getting over 100#, it would be a different story. I am happy for those that routinely get above that and would never question their numbers. Now if someone were to claim in excess of 300#, I might question the accuracy of their scale...
JW. I guess I need to check My scales Because I have hives that produce very close that much per year. I have hives that spend their entire lives on a trailer. They leave Pa. in November and head to Fl. where they stay through the orange bloom. Each hive produces between 30 and 60 pounds of surplus honey 45 pounds would be a good average. They then go to Georgia for their spring bloom where I average another 45 pounds. Then to the Juanita valley of Pa where they work the sourwood, Locust, fruit trees. They are then moved to the locust, autumn olive and Linden bloom in northern Pa. Where they remain until July 1st +- for another 30 pound average. They then go to south Dakota to take advantage of clover. a slightly better average of 47.5 pounds and return to Pa in early September where they sit among 400 acres of Asteraceae. Which fill the winter stores and provide near 60 pounds of excess. 287.5 Not counting what is stored in the hive bodies. There are many different beekeeping profiles one's intent for the bees and their production can very widely. I know guys who harvest over 200 pounds per year. and never overwinter a single hive. I also know guys who over winter 40 hives and only harvest 50 pounds per hive. It is never a slow day in any of my apiaries!
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top