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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there's a huge range on this, but I'm just curious how overwintering a nuc comes out compared to a large hive.

Where I'm at, the goldenrod flow usually ends in late September and the maples bloom around Feb 20th. In general, a healthy hive would need about 50-60 lbs.

I'd feed the nuc syrup till they quit taking it, but how many frames should they have? Or how much candy should I make for them?

Thanks for any insights!

~Tara
 

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it all depends on the size of the colony in the nuc and how well they are organized.

This past winter was very gentle in Maine. I had a 5 frame medium nuc winter sucessfully.

That said, I generally consider a 5 frame deep to be minimum size and I feel better with a 5 frame deep and a medium on top.

Nectar flow shuts off here mid September and the maples bloom mid April.

Best,
-Erin
 

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4 frames of honey. one of brood. you want them to be "honeyed out" in the winter. come spring you can rearrange. I think others just use 2 or so, and 2 of brood, with one of foundation for build out. Depends on your area I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oldtimer--I have a hive started from a nuc that I got early June (2 meds high and working on their 3rd), a nuc I got last weekend that will probably get to 2 full medium boxes before it gets cold, and I'm going to start a nuc tomorrow.

I don't really have any high expectations for the one I start tomorrow, but I want to practice On-the-Spot queen making and see what happens, and for how long. I may make this one into an observation hive and keep it in my garage. I want to see what happens, see how late I can start one and have it survive, see what works and what does not. Given that, I want to do the best I can to help it survive!

Erin--can you tell me more about your 5-frame medium that survived? Did you winter it on top of a full hive? When/how much did you feed it? In general, how did you make it work being that small?? (I ask because I plan to run all med equipment, and double stacked meds can get awkward) :)

Thanks!
 

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This may be a stupid question, but is it possible to pull out a frame or two of honey, put in an empty one, let them fill that up for winter and then sometime in the spring, rather than feeding, put the honey combs back in?

I'm guessing the must be something wrong with this for some reason cause I've not seen it mentioned anywhere. Will the honey not keep in the comb that long or some other problem?

~Matt
 

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Excellent plan! :thumbsup:
Seriously?

From what I've read from a couple places that honey is a better feed than just about anything else. To make matters more interesting I think I've read that bees won't take feed if it's too cold...doesn't feeding them their own honey in their own hive at their own temp solve all that?

Again I'm pretty much clueless here and just "Planning" at this point but it would seem to me that feeding them their own food in a form they recognize is the best plan available for a small honey operation if it can actually work.

I can see how that might not be a viable plan for a commercial set up, where you going to safely store all those frames filled with honey, but if it's workable on a smaller, hobbyist, level why don't more people do it? Or do they and I'm just missing them talking about it :)

~Matt
 

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I think with some smaller beekeepers, they might prefer to eat the fruits of their labors or share it with friends, than feed it back!:)
I can see that, but I guess I'd rather have healthy bees, skip the cost of having to buy feed and or feeders and have a little less honey than the other option.

~Matt
 
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