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Neither my wife nor I have bee venom allergies, but was curious how many keep an epipen handy just in case it hits the fan.
 

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I do, but only because I already had a nut allergy before I started beekeeping. I think if you tell your doc you are a beek and want one on hand, most docs wouldn't hesitate to prescribe. However, be sure that you are trained on how to give the shot, ESP if you need to give it to yourself. I had an aniphylactic reaction and had to give myself the shot: the shots not hard but when you can't breathe and are starting to panic, nothing is easy. I think it's never a bad idea to be prepared!
 

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I used to, but no longer do. I keep benadryl in the house and my wife knows where it is.

I'm overly cautious and having once been certified for giving epi in a summer camp scenario, I want no part of practicing medicine without a license presuming there is competent emergency medical care available in a timely manner. (by using an epi pen on someone the pen was not prescribed for)
 

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I am getting one on Thursday. Had a reaction to stings last week and made the appt with the doc in order to have one on hand just in case a reaction turns nasty.
 

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I have them if I absolutely need them. If I get stung, 1/4 of a bottle of Benedryl goes down the hatch immediately. It helps significantly.
Epi pens come with a "training pen" so you can get used to the process. You are encouraged very strongly to get medical attention after the use of an epi pen.
 

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I also carry epi even tho I have no defined allergy. I am Wilderness First Aid trained and its a good idea.
 

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We have no known allergies in our immediate family, although my father in law claims to be allergic, he got stung in the throat one time and had a hard time breathing, ne normally carries one, but we got one just in case he is over and would happen to get stung and didn't have his. I don't think I would administer one on someone else unless directed by 911 though just for libiality reasons.
 

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Screw liabilities I'm not standing around watching someone die. Just don't pull the trigger early.
 

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After getting a lot of stings 20-30 I had a reaction.. I now keep a bottle of liquid Polarimin (hayfever medicine ) in my car just in case.
 

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I got a prescription but never had it filled. Probably should. I do keep beneadryl in the glove box all the time.
 

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Screw liabilities I'm not standing around watching someone die. Just don't pull the trigger early.
Nice sentiment (truly) but what happens if the person you administer EPI to reacts to it in some way or was not having a reaction that called for EPI? That is my fear. That's why I phrased my response as I did - "presuming there is competent emergency medical care available in a timely manner."
 

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Nice sentiment (truly) but what happens if the person you administer EPI to reacts to it in some way or was not having a reaction that called for EPI? That is my fear. That's why I phrased my response as I did - "presuming there is competent emergency medical care available in a timely manner."
If you call 911 and ask to speak with "Medical Direction" regarding a "possible anaphylactic emergency," you'll be connected to a doctor who can authorize you (aka, prescribe) to use an epi-pen to save the life of someone whom it wasn't originally prescribed for. IF you go through that route, then you're actually giving them the shot under that doctor's medical license, and so should be covered under their liability/malpractice insurance, as well.

That said, I myself am very sensitive/allergic to bee venom; I haven't had any anaphylactic reactions to one yet (thankfully), but due to the other reactions I have had, I always cary Benadryl, and an epi-pen with me (NOTE: an Epi-Pen is NOT a "cure" for anaphylaxis...it just keeps you alive for long enough for benadryl, or another antihistamine to "kick in").
 

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I got a set because I'm a new beekeeper and have no idea how I'll react to being stung (which hasn't happened yet, 6 weeks in.) Also, my wife is an excessively brave person-- she married me, after all-- and doesn't like to wear a veil when helping me with the hives, and I don't know how she'll react when she gets stung.

I was pretty shocked to see how expensive they were.
 

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Try to hold your breath for 5 minutes....now you know what it would be like for the perosn dying in front of you to watch you waiting for teh ambulance wringing yours hands.

The point is, you cant use it, under "direction" or not, if you dont have it. I have been thru several anaphylaxis workshops, the method of death in these cases is horrible to comprehend. Serious reactions can close off the airway in minutes.

You take the level of precautions you feel comfortable with, I just don't advocate the idea that we avoid options due to potential liability. Know what you are getting into...get trained and get out and live life.
 

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Know what you are getting into...get trained and get out and live life.
You keep mentioning training. There is no training out there that advocates administering prescription medicine to someone when it's not their prescription. Including WFA. Yes, I'm certified too.

Would most of us do it if there were no alternative? Does that mean you go out and stock up on prescription meds to pass out "just in case"? I don't think it does.
 

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Its a epi pen people. If you get stung relax and get in touch with you body.....if you think you feel tightness of the chest, shallow or trouble breathing, or any other strange feeling besides a bit of pain or itching - Jam it against your leg and press the button.

I just got one and it is amazingly easy to use. My pen came with a practice pen. You guys arguing about needing a trained medical professional or proper guidance - sheesh! Easier to use then swallowing an aspirin....which could choke a person if they do it wrong or swallow down the wrong tube....but you would never hesitate to administer a Aspirin.

Of course, if you were chocking to death in front of me and the ol' Heimlich failed, I would probably puncture that soft spot in your throat and throw a breather tube in before watching you die. Sue me later if you survive......
 
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