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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a hive swarm. It had 4 frames of capped queen cells. This hive was 1 of 2 hives that were strong enough to give me a good honey production this year, but If I wait for a queen to hatch and get laying and those bees to forage the flow will be mostly over. I also had several splits I made this year that have laying queens. One queen of those queens is a laying fanatic, having filled every cell in the box with eggs. I marked her and put her in a cage. I removed all the frames with queen cells on them and made a new split and added one to a queen-less hive. I put the cage in the box and the bees are acting real nice to it (i.e not aggressively trying to kill her).

Question: How soon can I release her? She was a very productive laying queen, which is what i understand is a big positive for acceptance into a new hive. I guess that the bees can sense that she is currently in a good laying mode. Is 24 hours too soon? It may be moot since I just duct taped over the holes in the cage I made just before doing the transfer, but if they haven't chewed through that, what do ya'll say?

Don
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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If I have a queen who is laying and wish to introduce her to a queenless hive, I just pick up the frame with the queen on it and put it in the queenless hive. No issues since she is laying. Now that you caged her, I would put her in a candy cage and let them chew through the candy. A marshmallow can work.
 

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If they are indeed queenless, and she is laying, she'll be fine. Do not leave her in a cage for more than a day, as her pheromone levels will begin to drop. If she has been in a cage for several days, use a push-in cage such as a Laidlaw push-in queen introduction cage, that lets her lay some eggs before you release her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice guys. Went back the next day and they had the duct tape pulled back and she was released. The hive was nice and quiet, so they seemed happy enough.

Had another one of my larger hives that was hopelessly queenless (no eggs, no cells, loads of capped brood) that I took Michael's advice on. Found the queen in one of my nucs that was laying pretty good, marked her and put her on a frame of eggs and put that frame in the queenless hive.

I'll check again in a few days to see how these two are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice guys. Went back the next day and they had the duct tape pulled back and she was released. The hive was nice and quiet, so they seemed happy enough.

Had another one of my larger hives that was hopelessly queenless (no eggs, no cells, loads of capped brood) that I took Michael's advice on. Found the queen in one of my nucs that was laying pretty good, marked her and put her on a frame of eggs and put that frame in the queenless hive.

I'll check again in a few days to see how these two are doing.


Update: Both hives have laying queens.... yippee!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm splitting a 10 frame deep hive into two 5 frame deep nucs to give to a friend.

One of the nucs will receive the queen. The other nuc will get re-queened from another resource nuc.
I need to know if I should wait a few hours to release the queen in there, or put her in there right away. She is a laying queen.
Or should I put her in a cage with some marshmellow in the end?

I can't just give him my spare nuc because they are not deep framed boxes. I'm in the process of converting over to all mediums.

I'm doing the split tomorrow, so that he can pick them up on Saturday, so I hope a get a quick response here.
 
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