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Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up a few queens. I am going to replace one queen that's a drone layer, and make a couple of splits. How long after pinching the DL queen/splitting do I need to wait to introduce the new queens? They are in plastic cages with fondant plugs.

I see there is a lot of chatter about waiting a day or two but recall hearing from other experienced keepers who wait much less than that.

thx
 

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I never wait. Remove old queen, and give new queen. Waiting means emergency cells will be started, reducing the acceptance.

To requeen a DL colony, I would adda couple frames of emerging brood, and use a push-in cage to introduce the new queen.

For making splits, from a queen-right colony, you can use the shipping cage.
 

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I never wait. Remove old queen, and give new queen. Waiting means emergency cells will be started, reducing the acceptance.

To requeen a DL colony, I would adda couple frames of emerging brood, and use a push-in cage to introduce the new queen.

For making splits, from a queen-right colony, you can use the shipping cage.
I do splits right away. Make them, put the queen (in cage) in there and you're done.
 

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I never wait. Remove old queen, and give new queen. Waiting means emergency cells will be started, reducing the acceptance.

To requeen a DL colony, I would adda couple frames of emerging brood, and use a push-in cage to introduce the new queen.

For making splits, from a queen-right colony, you can use the shipping cage.
Agreed. We just made some splits yesterday with some hawaiian queens and we threw them in immediately. I also remove the attendants on introduction what do you think of that Michael?
 

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I introduce them right away after killing the old queen. If the colony has time to start queen cells, they are more apt to reject your offer of a stranger. I sometimes rub the old queen into the replacements cage to attempt some scent transfer.
 

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I introduce them right away after killing the old queen. If the colony has time to start queen cells, they are more apt to reject your offer of a stranger. I sometimes rub the old queen into the replacements cage to attempt some scent transfer.
I like that idea!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I requeened the DL hive today... Pinched the old queen then took a frame of emerging brood from another hive and used a push in cage to introduce the new queen. I let about a half dozen bees stay in the cage with the queen (these were bees that came with the new queen, not from a hive) and put the cage over about half capped brood and half empty cells. I don't believe it covered any honey or pollen. Is this OK? How long should I give it before releasing her?
 

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When doing splits, making up nucs, replacing a queen, I leave them for about an hour, sometimes a bit less, then introduce the new laying queen direct onto a comb, no caging.

If the new queen had been sent through the post or caged for several hours I introduce using a cage.
 

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Ideal, in my opinion, is between 2 hours and 12 hours. Overnight is nice, but 2 hours is fine. If you wait longer, as Michael Palmer said, they will start queen cells. I'm pretty fond of 2 hours... that's long enough that they know they are queenless.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
All went well... I just checked and the requeening was successful for all. I'd immediately introduced the caged queen to the splits and had released the queen in the DL hive under a push in cage. Released her today (four days later) and she happily took off on a stroll around the frame.
 
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