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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a hive that I split and it appears the queen did not return from her mating flight. No eggs on the 30th day after the split. I am going to check one more time today, day 34. If I see no sign of her, I need to decide if I should give them another shot at making a queen,or combine them. Weighing in favor of giving them another shot is I really like the mother queen. Weighing against is if I need to supply a frame of larvae every week. Is there any general agreement on how long it takes for a hive to go LW?
Thanks, J
 

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You're already just about passed 1 complete brood cycle, I'd be surprised if they haven't already started to go LW. Unless there's a bunch of capped queen cells in there I'd inspect and get another frame of brood in.
 

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I have a hive that I split and it appears the queen did not return from her mating flight. No eggs on the 30th day after the split. I am going to check one more time today, day 34. If I see no sign of her, I need to decide if I should give them another shot at making a queen,or combine them. Weighing in favor of giving them another shot is I really like the mother queen. Weighing against is if I need to supply a frame of larvae every week. Is there any general agreement on how long it takes for a hive to go LW?
Thanks, J
At 28 days I did not find eggs and put in a test frame; next day no cells started. Today, day 31, lots of eggs and caught and marked the new queen. Bad weather, no sun or a bit too windy and they can easily be delayed. Also, for me, easy to miss their first small batch of eggs. I cant depend on seeing them until they get milk in the cells.
 

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I just had a hive with TONS of laying workers 28 days after they went queenless and the queen did not return on her mating flight. Seemed a bit fast to me.
 

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I just had a hive with TONS of laying workers 28 days after they went queenless and the queen did not return on her mating flight. Seemed a bit fast to me.
What was the nature of the event that made them "queenless"? A queen gradually losing her pheremones might enhance the inclination to laying workers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. No sign of eggs but they act like they have a queen. Moving it to my daughter's tomorrow and will give a frame of eggs and larvae and see what happens. J
 

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I just had a hive with TONS of laying workers 28 days after they went queenless and the queen did not return on her mating flight. Seemed a bit fast to me.
I think the onset of L/W may be genetically-related, as I've had one hive go L/W within 7 days, and yet another queenless for over 6 weeks without any evidence of their presence.
LJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You may be right LJ. There doesn't appear to be any average. I also wonder if it has to do with available forage and time of year. J
 

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Without looking it up, I seem to recall that it isn't lack of queen pheromone that causes laying workers, but lack of brood pheromone, and I think it's like 6 weeks after the last brood emerges that you can get LW. Some of the things being reported in this thread are completely different from that, so more research might be needed by anyone wanting to get to the bottom of it.......
 
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