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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Under what conditions does one decide which mesh filter to use on newly harvested honey? I have 200, 400 and 600 micron filters that came as a kit and the 600 mesh appears to filter out really well so why would I use the 400 and 200 sizes? Thanks...
 

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I agree, 400 micron will be good. 200 micron will be too fine.

I have two sets. And I place the 600 over the 400 and swap the strainers when the one set gets clogged.
 

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The finer you filter the honey the longer it will take before it crystallizes.
Is this true?

Perhaps it is the heating of the honey that reduces the crystallization. 200 micron strainers will require heating the honey ...
 

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I just use the nylon bag strainer that fits inside a five gallon bucket, don't know what micron it is but it does a great job. John
 

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Under what conditions does one decide which mesh filter to use on newly harvested honey? I have 200, 400 and 600 micron filters that came as a kit and the 600 mesh appears to filter out really well so why would I use the 400 and 200 sizes? Thanks...
Strainers, they're strainers. Aren't they? Metal screens? Filters are much finer. Some made so the honey has to go thru diatomecous earth, heated and under pressure.

I can't tell you the technical differences, but the terms "strain" and "filter" are ones which mean somewhat different things.
 

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Is this true?

Perhaps it is the heating of the honey that reduces the crystallization. 200 micron strainers will require heating the honey ...
Not appreciably true. Unless one truely does filter and not strain. Some honeys crysatlized quicker, or sooner, than others. Early season honey, often from trees such as locust and basswood, do not crystalize as quickly as later season honeys, such as goldenrod and aster.
 

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If you are strapped for time, use the 600, if not the finer the mesh the clearer the honey. I use the 200 without heating but I'm not straining over 50 to 100 lbs at a go round.
 

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Strain is the correct term. Filtering, especially ultra-filtering is being prosecuted in Florida and other states that have honey laws. The feds are seeking additional revenue also. It is all the result of illegal Chinese importation, but every law was made from someone cheating or being stupid. The good news is Florida beekeepers can bottle and sell honey under the Cottage Food Law up to $15,000 combined food sales from their back door, roadside stands and flea markets/ farmer's markets. Anything beyond that is netting Florida $5000 per violation and they "stop sale and hold" the product.
 

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Remember that the finer you filter your honey the more goodness you'll lose such as pollen clear honey has almost none. So much for the nutrients when you heat it up also. Any time you use heat it changes the molecular composition of everything the heat touches. Like when you reheat coffee it gets that nasty taste far different from fresh brew.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, I get the point that I am STRAINING the honey, not filtering. So since I am not filtering will the finest mesh strainer at 200 microns take out the pollen that I want to keep in the honey or is this only possible with filtering?
 

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SQKCRK nailed it when he said:

I can't tell you the technical differences, but the terms "strain" and "filter" are ones which mean somewhat different things.

To find the answer to the "What will it remove" question, find the size of pollen in microns.

We do not filter, heat or strain(unless you count or backs). Time is your friend.

Crazy Roland
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Most plant pollens are from 2.5 to 200 microns in diameter
(found this in one of my very old text books) so it looks as if my smallest mesh strainer at 200 microns would let the vast majority of pollen through the mesh.
 
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