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How do you know if there is a good nectar flow going on? I have looked for info on my area (Upper Michigan) and all I get is generalities, is there some way for me to know for certain? Thank you
 

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According to Dr. Keith Delaplane,
- You will see bees flying actively at the entrance, especially in late afternoon
- Bees show little interest in sugar syrup, with practically no robbing
- A pleasant 'musky' odor fills the apiary as bees dehydrate nectar into honey
- White wax is being deposited on honeycomb and burr comb
- Bees festoon
- Bees are gentle
- Comb construction and nectar hoarding increase
- Raw honey drips from frame when shaken

When you see these signs, Delaplane says, 'add honey supers.'

HTH :)
 

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When I see new white wax being built then I know there is some sort of flow on. Mainly I look to see if there's a lot more nectar stored than there was the last time I was in the hive.

My main flow happens in the spring. It's about the only time I can get much comb drawn. I have some maintenance flows during the summer and while they may fill a super of drawn comb they won't draw out any new comb.
 

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According to Dr. Keith Delaplane,
- You will see bees flying actively at the entrance, especially in late afternoon
- Bees show little interest in sugar syrup, with practically no robbing
- A pleasant 'musky' odor fills the apiary as bees dehydrate nectar into honey
- White wax is being deposited on honeycomb and burr comb
- Bees festoon
- Bees are gentle
- Comb construction and nectar hoarding increase
- Raw honey drips from frame when shaken

When you see these signs, Delaplane says, 'add honey supers.'

HTH :)
Thank you for such an informative post. I've had the same question. I'll certainly look up Dr. Delaplane.
 

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I should have cited the book I used for the response above. It was taken from "Honey Bees and Beekeeping: A year in the life of an apiary," by Dr. Keith Delaplane.

We used this text and the supporting DVD videos for our Club's beekeeping class. :)
 

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Thats pretty spot on. Smell is best for me. You smell the flow, don't even need to open up the hive. This is especially useful during summer, when flows come and go, are short-lived driven by rain.

Another is moisture. Like during spring. Moisture will build rapidly, condensation will form overnight when temps drop.

According to Dr. Keith Delaplane,
- You will see bees flying actively at the entrance, especially in late afternoon
- Bees show little interest in sugar syrup, with practically no robbing
- A pleasant 'musky' odor fills the apiary as bees dehydrate nectar into honey
- White wax is being deposited on honeycomb and burr comb
- Bees festoon
- Bees are gentle
- Comb construction and nectar hoarding increase
- Raw honey drips from frame when shaken

When you see these signs, Delaplane says, 'add honey supers.'

HTH :)
 

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The bees land very "heavily" as if they were bombers with their bombs still in the racks. They will also miss the landing board more often. OMTCW
 
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