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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading in another post that someone was getting
180-200 lbs of honey per hive. how many frames is that
(are they small, medium, large) does it take to accomplish
this? that's alot isn't it? is it some kind of reversing
procedure? please explain, I would love to get that
much honey!!! :D
 

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Location, Location, Location!! No kidding just take a look at some of the per hive yields in SD, ND, Sask, and Manitoba. I'm sure there are others. A very short concentrated season. guys up there that don't get a 150 lb average want to know whats wrong.
 

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The amount of honey a single hive produces depends on many factors. There really is no trick that you can do to make the bees produce more with the exception of making sure they have the population to forage and gather.
 

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Skill and luck in addition to location. I'm heavy into luck. Of the three parent colonies I split, only one of them didn't try to swarm. This hive drew the foundation for 4 medium supers and has packed them with honey, I extracted two of them least month and they are full again. That will make 6 x 35 pounds = 210 pounds for that one hive. The others will have averaged two supers for the season. With more skill I might have prevented the others from attempting to swarm and thus had a consistently larger field force to gather nectar.
One other factor, I think, is drawn comb or the lack of it; Starting off you have none; The bees want to back fill the space in the brood nest rather than draw out more foundation; Then they swarm away.
I'm wondering if next year I'll be that much better of a beekeeper, or will the fact that I can bang on supers with drawn comb help take some pressure off the swarming urge. Who knows! :scratch: I'll tell you next year.
 

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To get 200+ lbs./hive I believe the perfect storm must take place, location, weather, hives that come through the winter strong and healthy, great queens, prevent swarming without them missing a heartbeat, giving all drawn combs especially the supers, and lastly once again location and weather. John
 

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Householder,
When you say all, I have to ask how do you extract frames that have brood in them, without making a mess in the honey?
 

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I expect to average 200 lbs/hive. Last year 7 lbs/hive. Weather and location determine flow along wih good bees(last yrs bees were stronger!). My best year was 1982 275 lbs/hive. Some yards will get close this year and a few hives have hit deep super number 7. What made our crop was the two droughts thinning the grass flollowed by last years wet season germinating clover everywhere. THen in most lcoations sufficient rain this year coupled with humid hot weather. MOst commercial guys extract frame with brood in it...guess there is some bee juice in the honey!
 

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>Most commercial guys extract frame with brood in it...guess there is some bee juice in the honey!

I didn't need to know that!:(
 

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Most will leave the brood capped and only scratch open the honey when extracting frames with brood in them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
so established hives that were overwintered, drawn
frames, prevent swarming, location(which I'm still
cofused about), weather, management, and a little
luck. Well is that all:D
I had one colony swarm 3 times that I know of, if I had
prevented them all I would have had a huge return then.
I'm learning, I'm learning.

as always, Thanks everyone!!
I think I'd be totally confused without you.
 

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My first thought, you must first be in an area that has enough forage for hives to produce the desired quantity. Some areas are just not capable. So you need to do a good assessment and check with others around you.

It starts with an overwintered hive with a queen that is only 6-8 months old. You also need 5-9 supers with fully drawn comb ready to go. Then it is all about the quality of your observation powers. You need to know when they will start swarming. Around here it is mid to late Feb. So at the end of Jan I go thru the brood boxes and pull ALL honey out and backfill with drawn comb ( at least 2 deeps ) NO LAYERS of honey in the middle of the top brood box. Then 2-3 weeks later each hive gets 2-3 empty supers on top of an excluder.
Now it becomes a matter of understanding when you get nectar flows. Once the bees have made significant progress on the topmost super I will slide 2 more supers on just on top of the excluder. Yeah, I know that it is work but it works for me. When the top two supers are capped off I will remove, spin and put back (again directly on top of the excluder).
If you are successful, you will be amazed at the entrance activity. “Monster” hives will have 20-30 flights per second. Normal hives are only around 5 per second. For the last few years I have managed to get 3 or 4 boomer hives like this. Two of them were early swarm retrievals that were put into drawn brood boxes. They each gave me 5 supers.

Fuzzy
 

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The location part is relatively simple. Upper mid westis such an area, Canadian Prairie provinces. Arkansas isn't one of them. I don't know the state average but it isn't in that range of your desires. To get that kind of return in your state you would have to be exceptionally skilled and 4 or 5 times luckier. If that were the case you could use your special talents at the race track or the casino.

Jean-Marc
 

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. MOst commercial guys extract frame with brood in it...guess there is some bee juice in the honey!
Ahh hello....queen excluders!!!!

Our first year we bought 2# packages, two hives. All the comb and supers were brand new, no drawn comb. That year we had a drought and alfalfa thrives in hot dry weather. Our production from two hives was 620 pounds.

Our average yield is 150-180 a year per hive. Some years we do consideralby better. The last 4 years have seen very wet, flood like conditions and cool summers. The 150 average is on those years. If we get a hot dry year, our bees go crazy. And yes all this happens between July 12 and August 31---give or take a couple of weeks on either side of the date.
We can easily get another 50+ pounds in the first two weeks of september, but we chose to do our fall prep instead of getting the honey crop to minimize spring deadouts.

Location location and location


I would imagine by the time honey householder extracts his brood chambers, the queens have shut down and brood is at a minimum in the honey house
 

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Suttonbee said:
>Most commercial guys extract frame with brood in it...guess there is some bee juice in the honey!

I hate this kind of a statement. Most commercial guys I know don't extract brood frames at all...it's all honey supers. The odd super that has a frame or two of brood in it is placed back in the box, not run through the uncapper. Brother... :rolleyes:
 

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Ahh hello....queen excluders!!!!
Uhh HELLO, if you have 500 colonies and 10% of the excluders don't work you will have 50 colonies w/ brood above the excluder. If you have a hive that has an excluder in it and it swarms, the newly mated queen often goes to the top of the hive.
 

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Who extracts brood boxes? I run all my hives in a single deep w/queen excluders. No brood!:doh: Who wants that mess? 175 lb avg. is over 800+ hives. I've had some hives produce 12-14 mediums already this year.(yes almost a barrel from one hive.) It takes that kind of hive to get those kind of avg. Drawn combs help out A LOT!
 

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Honey householder, do you pull brood frames just before spring flow to force nurse bees to be foragers sooner? Dont know how someone has bees and no brood otherwise? Just trying to learn.
 
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