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On March 1st 2010 and captured the below hive. I was exhausted when it was over but very happy with the bee vac I had built and the shear number of Bees I sucked up. I put 5 frames of old comb and brood from the original hive into empty medium frames which went into a Super on top of a Deep that was very full of bees. There was also room for 4 frames with wax foundation

I spent a few days fooling around with Feeders, Syrup, and other stuff. I was afraid I was tormenting the bees to much. Eventually I put a pollen patty inside and left them alone until the 15th

March 15, 2010 I opened the hive for the first actual inspection. I was overwhelmed at the amount of life inside the hive. All 9 frames in the super were covered with bees. Every frame had new drawn comb in it. The pollen patty was almost gone except for a small sliver. When I tried to move the frames they were all stuck together with the new comb. I think they call that burr comb. And just the movement was destroying new brood and larva. I was afraid to slide out all the frames because of the damage it would have done. However I could get a peek down into the deep and there was considerable new comb being drawn down there as well. I was afraid to split the boxes for fear of losing the obviously active Queen. I'm a little bit overwhelmed here. How in the world am I ever going to get that super full of burr comb cleaned up and operational again.

Curt
 

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do your work over the top of the upside down cover, start at the outside frame where the queen is unlikely to be, and just be brutal. use your hive tool and scrape and cut and only leave the good. they will be set back some but will rebuild. you must pay the price for not stopping them in time, but it will be fine. good luck,mike
 

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Like Mike said, you have to cut it and clean it up. If the hive tool is not long enough sneak a long knife out of the kitchen. Serrated knives work best. My schedule is different enough, my wife just thinks I am great for doing the dishes while she is working. The sooner you get it done the easier it will be.
 

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P.S. when you put the frames back in, push them tightly together and leave any extra space on the outside. make sure you put in 10 frames. good luck,mike
 

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Hi Curt, from what you wrote you put all the old comb into the medium super right? If so, put the medium on the bottom board, drill a 1" hole in the deep between the hand hold and the bottom of the frames (regulate the holes size w/ a cut up cork), wait till the queen moves up to the deep (you'll start finding eggs in the deep). Put a queen excluder between the super and the deep just to be sure (or find the queen in the deep). After a couple weeks you should have pretty much all the brood hatched out and you can start carving on and or culling the old comb.
I did a couple cut outs last year and I know what you mean about feeling like you're tormenting the bees, but you want to get that old comb culled out.
 

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I deal with bad comb during the next year. I put leave the difficult box on the bottom. Then next winter/spring before they get going and are still in the top box, I just remove the bottom one and fix it in my garage.

Way less stress on me and the bees.
 

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I made the same mistake last year by shorting my brood box with only 9 frames - it was a horrible experience.
 
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