Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,
My brother has a colony of bees in the wall of his house. They have been there 15 plus years, but need to be removed. I would like to keep these bees because they are suvivors that have lived next door to me for 15 years. They are the hive that got me intersted. Any help would be appreciated because I am a newbie. Thanks for all the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,025 Posts
The only way to get the bees out and not leave a mess for rodents, other insects and disease to get into the wall is to remove the siding or sheating (or dywall from the inside): cut the comb out and move it to supers, tied to frames with string or rubber bands; brush the bees out of the cavity: clean as much of the comb and hive residue out to prevent rodents and diseases; seal the wall very well especially where they got in in the first place. If you just vacuum the bees out, kill them, or trap what leaves the wall, there will still be comb within the wall that will attract more insects, rodents and diseases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am planning on starting to remove bees and comb / honey and putting this in a brood box and shutting them up after they go to the queen (if I can find her) I thought if I put the brood in the box and let it sit in front of the hive for a couple of days they would follow and go to the brood. What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,025 Posts
You will probably have the queen on one of the brood combs. If you do not they will cluster wherever she is. You can brush them onto a frame or into a box. Leaving the hive near the wall still exposed may get a few foragers flying, but most of the hive will already be in their new home. In my experience, the queen usually does not survive moving the comb. You will drop some, some will collapse on itself, you will squish bees wherever you grab the comb. Requeening in a week is always good just to have a new vigorous queen of known genetics anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I did this once in the last 30 days and let me tell you it was a big mess. Two nest in the same house. Separate locations of the house.

As mentioned above, I'd suggest taking rubber bands and hive boxes with frames. Place nest in hive box at place of removal. This cuts the time you have to be involved with them once you arrive to their new location.

Also, I suggest limiting how much honey cone you bring home. Makes for a big mess and hive beetle larve explodes (Don't ask how I know...).

You're going to get a lot of bees if that nest is 15 years old. Might consider preparing more than one hive box for the job.

The one I did was my first and last FREE honey bee removal from inside a home!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,548 Posts
I would use a beevac too. This limits the amount of bees you have flying around the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Having made many mistakes in a cut out last weekend, I recommend a good bee suit,vac, and plenty of clean, food grade buckets for comb. don't make the mistake I made of putting capped honey in the same bucket with uncapped honey, it kind of wreaks the whole honey process. I wish I had a do-over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
When you take the bees out clean out all comb and honey and spray the cavity with bleach and water then pack with insulation. I would take the bees far away as you can, next door wont be good they may want to go back where they came from and bleach wont do them much good. the bee vac works great i have done several cutouts with mine, once you start the cutout stay the course and be orginized buckets and tarps work well, brood in one, honey in one, trash in the other. have fun and get someone to video you .
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top