Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, All! I am a big confused about the deep hive box.
It seems that a deep is just a ~10" medium size hive box.
When I went to a bee store to ask about buying a deep frame the store
clerk gave me a medium size frame--19" top bar x 9" end bars x 17 bottom bar. That was the ones I built before. Needless to say I
got confused here. So my question is how deep is a deep hive or a deep frame to fit in?
I have often read here that in certain area beekeepers use a deep and 2 mediums to over winter with. So this deep at the bottom they use is the same as the medium I bought?
Is there such a thing as deeper than a medium deep hive box? What is its dimension then? I'm so confused....Please help clarify!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,989 Posts
All Langstroth style boxes are the same width and length, 16 1/4 inches by 19 7/8 inches long, outside measurements using standard lumber. They come in different depths depending on what size frame is to be used in the box. The deep frame has an end bar that is 9 1/8 in. deep, the medium is 6 1/4 in. deep, the shallow is 5 3/8 inches deep. The Langstroth box has the 1/4 in. bee space above the frames and a 1/8 in. bee space below the frames, so when you add the bee space length to the end bar length the deep box should be 9 4/8 inches deep. Different manufactures fudge a little, Mann Lake boxes are an extra 1/8 inch deep which makes their boxes 9 5/8.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,106 Posts
But then, of course there are exceptions. Odfrank, has posted earlier about his experiments using "Dadant Deeps", which are a bit deeper than the standard 9-5/8" Langstroth "deep".
It's not an "experiment". It's a lifestyle. I have been living it since 1979.

Dadant deeps use a 11 1/4" deep frame and are 11 5/8"+ deep.

Here is my little trailer stacking up this year:
The top of the hives you see off to the left are also on DD frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,373 Posts
Odfrank,
I had not realized that it was how you regularly kept bees. Though after revisiting some of those older threads, after seeing beepro's post, I did start to realize that was the case.

I only hesitate to try it myself (even as an experiment), is that every year, when our summer heat hits, many hives loose a few combs to heat collapse, even if wired. I'm afraid worse would happen with the even deeper combs. But, though I'm dedicated to using primarily all medium depth frames, I do like to experiment, and will probably build at least one Dadant deep to play with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Langstroth deep hives are 9-5/8", mediums (supers) are 6-5/8", shallows are 5-3/4", and comb supers are 4-3/4". The above dimensions apply to a 10-frame box; 8-frame boxes are 19-7/8" X 13-3/4" or 13-7/8".

All dimensions can be found at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langstroth_hive
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Deep is deep, right? Whether it contains brood or honey (super), the dimensions are the same, AFAIK.

Just to further clarify, if you will pardon me JR, a deep super is 9 5/8" tall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Right F6, I was just adding a cpl of words to JR's Post in an attempt to make it more clear what was meant. The way I was taught in drafting class in High School the dimensions of a box or cube are length, width, and depth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,433 Posts
The actual measurement on older boxes may vary a bit, and I would expect minor variations in size from different runs of boxes. The 9 1/8" frames in a 9 5/8 box encourage the bees to put drones in the vertical space between combs, as it's 1/2" instead of 3/8", but if the boxes shrink a bit with age, this should be less of a problem.

There is also enough variation between the frames, rabbet depth, and box depth between the major manufacturers of bee equipment (to say nothing of what happens when beekeepers make their own!) that one should check to make sure all your equipment is compatible. A box with frames flush with the bottom will leave too much space above and not enough below if those boxes have the standard 1/8 depth past the frames and 1/4" over them.

The bees, of course, do not care, but they will cheerfully propolize the frames together if they are too close. And build comb between them if they are too far apart, too.

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,106 Posts
>I had not realized that it was how you regularly kept bees.

After 44 years of accumulating hives I have become an equal opportunity hive size beekeeper. I this year for the first time added eight frame hives to my mix. With jumbo depth frames I have 12 - 12 frame wide hives and about 20 ten frame wide hives. And nuc box / bait hives to fit the deeper size frames also. I manage topbar and Warre hives for others but now only own a Warre because I won it in the Honey Hive raffle. I might cram a cut out into it soon.

As I have said before, I keep multiple styles of hives because society dictates I may only have one wife. I mitigate the frustration I suffer from that rule by flaunting how many types of hives I own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
>

As I have said before, I keep multiple styles of hives because society dictates I may only have one wife. I mitigate the frustration I suffer from that rule by flaunting how many types of hives I own.
TRUST me Sir

The frustration of having only one wife is nothing compared to having several:}:no:

Don't ask me how I know....I just do!

Bee's and equipment are a lot cheaper also!:applause: lol
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top