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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I go through a lot of work to make an 8-frame medium hives. I cut box joints , glue these guys up then shoot small nails in to them. When I place them on top of each other, I will get the dreaded ROCKER.

Looking at it from above I will put a square in each corner and they are square.....but then in the end I get the rocker; This is more than aggravating since I cut the hand holds into each board.

For those of you who make your own equipment, what am I not doing?

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Uh, thanks buzzz...but part of the appeal of this hobby is complete emersion in most aspects of beekeeping- especially woodworking...Here, let me get out of here and let someone else take a stab at my question...thanks for your input!
I would just buy them. It is easier and you wont have that problem. But, you could get a box joiner. I have been looking for a 17" inch planer but, they don't exist that will go big enough to do a whole box.
 

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When cutting your boards to length the ends have to be cut perfectly square. If you are off even a 32nd it will rock. When putting them together before glue sets up set them on a concrete floor on top of each other, I go 5 or 6 high, with a couple cement blocks on top for weight till they dry.
 

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My first suggestion is to check the absolute squareness of your end cuts. In box joints the bottom of gullets are the mating line, not the overall length to the end of projections. In some things small differences may cancel and be insignificant but if your system makes them additive you will see the result.

Many compound sliding miter saws have too much flex for good repeatability. Also the two halves of the back fence are often not perfectly parallel. On a table saw the miter slide may not be set exactly to register square with the degrees scale.

If you are doing rabbeted joints on a table saw any curve or twist end to end in your fence can haunt you.
 

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Uh, thanks buzzz...but part of the appeal of this hobby is complete emersion in most aspects of beekeeping- especially woodworking...Here, let me get out of here and let someone else take a stab at my question...thanks for your input!
Do what you do best and pay for the rest.

Are you in this hobby because of the woodworking or because of the beekeeping? Avoid the frustration and buy your boxes, unassembled of course. You'll be happier, I suspect.
 

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Make sure the pieces are square.
Assemble based on the outside of the wood and not based on a tight rabbit joint. The rabbit cuts are often sloppy. The gap on the rabbit cuts can be filled with glue later.
I think a rocker is caused by a twist in the board. Rossman's cypress deeps frequently rock.
Go to the granite/kitchen shop and get a small piece of granite cheap. (left overs, too small for anything else, etc)
Assemble and make sure its square.
Place on flat granite and see if it rocks.
If it rocks determine the low and high corners.
Place wedge twice the thickness of the gap under the low corner while the glue is still wet.
Clamp the two neutral corners to the piece of granite.
I am a hobbyist and aren't in any hurry. There is one bad rocker that has been clamped to the granite for a month now.
 

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When I make boxes (and that's rare), I do not cut the boards exactly to the correct height. IE a 9 5/8" box maybe 10" or so. When assembling, I make sure the top of the box (the rabbeted ends) are flush and true. Then once assembled, I set the saw for 9 5/8, and holding the now assembled box tight up against the fence, I trim all the edges by "rolling" the box. A perfect, flush, non-rocking box every time!
 

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I just make sure my equipment is cutting square and if not, adjust it. just the other day i made up a bunch, rocking boxes is just something i don't have a lot of problems with. It is probably like building most things, preparation is paramount.

G.
 

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When cutting your boards to length the ends have to be cut perfectly square. If you are off even a 32nd it will rock. When putting them together before glue sets up set them on a concrete floor on top of each other, I go 5 or 6 high, with a couple cement blocks on top for weight till they dry.
That is how I have done it and it has worked for me also,Seems to help even if the boards are little warped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
HOLY MOLY!!!!

I see a lot of us make our own boxes which I think is pretty rewarding if I can end up with a good product.

I see a lot of VERY use suggestions and will BUY boxes if I am ready to gouge my eyes out with a butter knife...but not a moment sooner....

I found an excuse to buy or upgrade tools so I can make my own boxes.....a compounding hobby!!!!!



That is how I have done it and it has worked for me also,Seems to help even if the boards are little warped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Do what you do best and pay for the rest.

Are you in this hobby because of the woodworking or because of the beekeeping? Avoid the frustration and buy your boxes, unassembled of course. You'll be happier, I suspect.
Well, When I bought my hives this year I bought one assembled and one unassembled....the one I assembled rocked.....it's a good thing wood is cheap and my time is my own and people can't hear me cussing...hahahah Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, When I bought my hives this year I bought one assembled and one unassembled....the one I assembled rocked.....it's a good thing wood is cheap and my time is my own and people can't hear me cussing...hahahah Thanks.
The box jig above was a little hard to follow....but thanks....I think starting with perfectly square ends is what I will next next time...like tomorrow. My problem could be in the assembly and a jog of soirts may be in order, although I used a jig of sorts on the work bench already...

IS THEE A RULE OF THUMB FOR MECAHNICALLY REMOVING OR ALLEVIATING THE ROCKER AFTER THE FACT?

Thanks everyone!!!
 

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I use butt joints. Box joints are for big producers. I glue them w/titebond II, screw them w/ 3" deckmate screws and assemble them using clamps on a flat surface. After the 1st 2 (where I tried to use rabbett joints) they have stacked perfectly and the boxes are solid.
 
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