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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Help with brood nest.

I have some questions pertaining to the order of the hives right now. Currently our hive has a new queen installed (we had to order the hive didn’t produce one) . During the absence of a queen, the bees filled the bottom brood chamber almost entirely with pollen and some nectar. The upper brood box became a honey store.. it’s almost entirely full of honey at this point. I understand that positioning inside the hive is important and you can wreck them if you mess with it too much. So, my question is, what are the bees going to do for space for the queen to lay? They’ve filled the bottom with pollen, the top with honey, and there is little space available for laying eggs. When we installed the queen, I did follow my gut and remove one frame of drawn comb that was full of pollen, and put that in the freezer. I replaced it with a single foundation frame. When we checked 3 days later to ensure the queen was released; they were drawing out the foundation but it wasn’t complete yet.

My current arrangement is :
bottom board,
10 frame deep with nine frames in it.,
10 frame deep with 10 frames in it,
10 frame shallow with drawn comb in it that I just put on a week ago but they’ve started to fill with honey,
extra ventilation rig,
top board, and
outer cover.


When I go in next week to check for eggs and larva, should I:

Remove some of the honey from the upper brood box.
Remove pollen frames from the bottom brood box, if so how many? 2-3?
Install foundation in the bottom brood to replace removed frames
Install pollen frames in the upper brood box in place of removed honey?


My concern at this point, and what I’m trying to fix is the lack of available laying space. However if the girls will rearrange all of this and fix it on their own, then I have nothing to worry about and nothing to bother with.

thanks for your thoughts.
 

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I believe you are more concerned with opening the brood nest than with housal positioning. In any case your posting title will grab the attention of the ones who will be able to respond with more authority.

Do a little searching around here. I believe some would suggest placing some empty frames in your boxes and remove some of the honey.

Are your current frames marked for housal positioning?
 

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HEATHERnRye,

It might be best to start a new thread, with a title like:

"Need help with my brood nest"
 

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the problem you are experiencing has nothing to do with housel positioning. Your bees have filled the brood chamber with pollen and nectar, marking the frames for housel positioning would not have prevented this. The bees did what they always do and that is fill holes with nectar and pollen, in the abscence of the queen and eggs/larva they have done just that. If you have successfully introduced a queen she needs room to lay and quickly. Option 1 is pull some frames of nectar/pollen and replace with drawn empty comb if you have it. Option 2 is pull some frames of nectar/pollen and replace with foundation in hopes they will draw it quickly giving her room to lay.
 

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option #3, extract some of the honey, & put the frames back into the middle of the broodnest.

If you don't do something, they might swarm once she starts laying. Or the bees might blame the new queen for not laying enough eggs, & kill her.
 

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Option #3 would be real nice, but I would need to borrow an extractor. :scratch:
 
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