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I am in the process of writing out a detailed business plan for my future (please God) career/life of beekeeping. I was going to see if I could get some of you who are much more experienced in this to help me with some of this.

One question I have for my expenses sheet is (on average) about how many hours will be spent on each hive each year. This would include inspections, medication, feeding, moving, hive maintenance, and anything else that I am not thinking of... I know this number probably depends on a lot, but I need some sort of realistic number to plug in to my break-even sheet.

I would appreciate any help on this!
 

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Should we assume that you're a hobbyinst making the transition to commercial beek?

If so it shouldn't be hard for you to estimate based upon what you do now.
 

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Well you won't get a realistic number. It changes constantly depending on the season. I would figure 8 hours a day (you won't have any trouble filling them) if you need a rough draft. But be prepared to put in 12-16 hr days during splits and queening in the spring and then depending on the number of hives you have during the summer pulling supers and extracting. That's not including your weekends if you plan on selling at markets.
 

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It is easy to spend 80% of your time on the 20% of your hives that are the least productive. Focus on the 80% that are going to make you your money, and worry about the 20% after the 80% are taken care of.

You need to calculate time backwards.

Decide how many hours you have available. Make a list of the most important things that need to be done. Do the most important things in the time you have available.

After the most important things get done, (and ONLY after they are done) you can do the lesser important things if you still have available time. And even if you don't get the lesser important things done, they aren't going to have as big an impact on your bottom line.

Stay on the right side of the 80/20. Don't waste time picking up nickels and dimes while your dollars are blowing away.
 

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Being a relatively new beek, this is not a fair question for me. I fight my self not to look in the hives daily. I try to get out to see the girls as often as possible and often never even break open the hive.

In answer to your question: I'm trying to spend as much time as possible.
 

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One question I have for my expenses sheet is (on average) about how many hours will be spent on each hive each year
from 10 to 20 direct hours inside each hive per year + 23 to 28 hours per hive = undirect, relaited to each hive, before you open lid, on established stationery beeyard.
( not including work related for: honey selling, pollination, transportation, etc.. )
 

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Somewhere between 300-500 hives is considered commercial beekeeping. This is doing bees as a full time job. You will work 2080 hours at a 40 hour a week job. 2080 divided by 300-500 hives is 4.2-6.9 hours per hive. This includes time in the hive, and time doing all associated work too.

Beekeeping isn't a 40 hour a week job. There is an off season too. You may or may not choose to work more than 40 hours a week during the regular season. This drops your hours per hive even lower than the 4-7 hours.
 
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