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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New to bees. And, decided to build my first beehive, which I thought would be part of the fun of being a beekeeper. After doing some reading about various beehive standards, I settled on wanting a horizontal longstroth beehive. Here are a few pictures of my hive as I slowly build it. I'm building it out of pine. On two legs I put wheels to make it easier to move, since I figured it is going to be heavy, if and when I should need to move it. I also bought 7 frame flow hive that I want to build a box for that would fit on top. I've read mixed reviews on flow hives. So, I'll find out how well bees like them. I still have to figure where I'm going to put the entrance. I'm also considering what to do to reduce the chance of the hive being robbed.

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Nice build. I’ve made a couple of long Lang’s now, too. Also had some flow frames and incorporated them into the end of my latest long hive. Hope to see them work soon, as our summer is just starting.

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I am the same mind as you Fiero Mike. I built 2 long Langstroth hives last winter, and have been very pleased with the set up for a back yard beekeeper. Some pics of my longhive.

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As you can see I made the roof high enough to put supers under the roof. I also have entrances on each did. With a vertical queen excluder I can run these as two queen hives.
 

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I've been thinking about building a long-lang ever since I've tried my first top bar hive. The top bar needs constant attention to keep comb straight & in the right places. The first 8 or 10 combs are fine, but they begin to degrade the further into the box they go. So I think lang frames would help the bees to be less apt to design their own comb.

However, what struck me first about your hive is the small wheels.......I'd prefer larger wheels that would handle grass & rough surfaces better.....something like 8-10" in diameter. (just a suggestion).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am the same mind as you Fiero Mike. I built 2 long Langstroth hives last winter, and have been very pleased with the set up for a back yard beekeeper. Some pics of my longhive.

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As you can see I made the roof high enough to put supers under the roof. I also have entrances on each did. With a vertical queen excluder I can run these as two queen hives.
Wow, I really like how your hives look. Gives me some ideas.
 

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I've been thinking about building a long-lang ever since I've tried my first top bar hive. The top bar needs constant attention to keep comb straight & in the right places. The first 8 or 10 combs are fine, but they begin to degrade the further into the box they go. So I think lang frames would help the bees to be less apt to design their own comb.

However, what struck me first about your hive is the small wheels.......I'd prefer larger wheels that would handle grass & rough surfaces better.....something like 8-10" in diameter. (just a suggestion).
I think you might be right about needing bigger wheels. I'll have to do some searching for some.
 

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Some upgrades to my inner covers. I found that a 3 inch hole fits a narrow mouth mason jar, and a 3.5 inch hole fits a wide mouth mason jar. By using two 1by6s and having the bottom with a 3 inch hole and the top board with a 3.5 inch hole you can make inner covers that accept both sizes of mason jars. They can also be used to make mason jar suppers or a hive in a jar.
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Some upgrades to my inner covers. I found that a 3 inch hole fits a narrow mouth mason jar, and a 3.5 inch hole fits a wide mouth mason jar. By using two 1by6s and having the bottom with a 3 inch hole and the top board with a 3.5 inch hole you can make inner covers that accept both sizes of mason jars. They can also be used to make mason jar suppers or a hive in a jar.
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Thanks. I've thought about mason jars to let the bees put honey into. Do you have any more pictures of your hive that you might share?
 

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This is a picture before I put on the roof. The hive body has a cut grid pattern so the bees can place propolis on all sides. Research out of Minnesota shows that a propolis envelope has many benefits to the bees. The main body was made with 2by12s. I then added a second 2by frame to but foam insulation. Over that is a 1by4 board and batten siding. So my long hives are 3.75 inch thick walls with foam insulation.

I also made the under roof spacing just enough to fit a deep. In the picture is one of my 5 frame nucs. I did this for easy installing of nucs. Or I can put supers on this hive. Each hive has an periscoping entrance on each end. Look up a YouTube video from Phil Chandelier, he has one about the periscope entrances. These periscope entrances have greatly reduced wasp and bumblebee from getting into the hive. They also limit mice from getting into the hive.

The bottom is #8 hardware cloth. The back of the hive has a door to the screened bottom.
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks. I'll search YouTube for the video. I've been thinking about my entrance and what to do for unwanted guests. I'm also pondering the roof/2nd level for flow hives, mason jars, medium supers/feeder combo, and/or possibly a spot for a NUC for a future 2nd hive.
 

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Went with a periscope entrance on an end after watching Phil Chandelier video. Still need to add handles to the same end to lift up and make it easier when moving. I was going to add picture to first post but have learned that after so many days that you can't do so. Here is a picture of the periscope entrance.

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I hope these pictures uploaded...My Layens frames are a little deeper than a Langstroth frame: 14.5 by 16 inches deep...:)

I have 14 frames per side with a division board between them in case I need to combine 2 swarms/weak hive with a strong hive...

A screened bottom board for SHB or Varroa with either a sticky board or Freeman style "swimming pool" LOL...

1.5 inch thick steel insulated panels, (garage door panels), help keep the hive lighter, but I hope to never have to move it!!!:eek::p;)

Lots of fun to build this prototype hive!!!
 

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Awesome build!!! I really like your gable roofs...I might try to build them on my next hive!!! I am South of the Mason/Dixon line, so a little worried about tornados though...sigh...;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
View attachment 43721 View attachment 43723 View attachment 43725 View attachment 43727 View attachment 43729 I hope these pictures uploaded...My Layens frames are a little deeper than a Langstroth frame: 14.5 by 16 inches deep...:)

I have 14 frames per side with a division board between them in case I need to combine 2 swarms/weak hive with a strong hive...

A screened bottom board for SHB or Varroa with either a sticky board or Freeman style "swimming pool" LOL...

1.5 inch thick steel insulated panels, (garage door panels), help keep the hive lighter, but I hope to never have to move it!!!:eek::p;)

Lots of fun to build this prototype hive!!!
Interesting, garage door should definately make it lighter. After looking at yours, it crossed my mind for just one second to considered redoing mine, but maybe another time. You'll have to let us know how the bees like it. However, I still need a roof and a garage door could be an option.
 
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