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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question about how good horizontal hives are in very hot climates.

My limited experience is only with vertical hives, where the honey super provides some sort of buffer in extreme heat for the brood below.

I like my lids insulated and will of course insulate the horizontal hive lid when I make one.

Not having honey frames above the brood, is it a disadvantage worth considering in very hot climates with horizontal hives? I do get occasional heatwaves, which will be increasing in frequency, of several days over 40degC (105F)
 

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Traditionally, horizontal hives are more likely to be found in very hot areas than almost anywhere else. Because horizontal hives eliminate the heat plume, heat leaves the hive more quickly than in a vertical hive. This is good in warm climates, but it can be a real problem in colder climates where I have seen horizontal hives struggle. The bees are also spread out horizontally so bees towards the bottom are not heating up the bees on top. Horizontal hives have more surface area facing upwards so heat can dissipate faster. I don't think you should have any problems with horizontal hives in extremely hot areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys, I was suspecting that might be the case.

Greg, you are correct in pointing me in that direction even though not all Africa is very hot, but Google is fraught with contradictory information.

One of the reasons I asked was because while researching I came across a beekeeper in South Australia that went through a scorching heatwave a year ago (temps 47°C, 117F) and did loose hives, as did other beekeepers around him. He said that the hives that survived where the ones with three boxes, two brood and one honey super. The single boxes, and the single brood+honey super perished in the extreme heat. He was implying that the boxes on top helped the bees to cope in the extreme heat in some way.

My horizontal hive will only have my insulation on top (and sides). What Akademee is saying, having the brood nest spread out horizontally, should mitigate this problem.
 

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Thanks guys, I was suspecting that might be the case.

Greg, you are correct in pointing me in that direction even though not all Africa is very hot, but Google is fraught with contradictory information.
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Of course, Africa is the second largest continent in the World and you'd need to pay attention to the local details.
Still, the top bars hives have been developed specifically with Africa in mind - I figure they do well.
If any place out there, Africa is plenty hot in general.

Honeyeater, here is a very good blog I enjoyed reading (but it is no longer active - too bad).
This is from Honduras (also plenty hot) and you may find relevant.
http://musingsonbeekeeping.blogspot.com/2014/07/welcome-and-bienvenidos-beginning-my_12.html
 

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There are some good Long Langs getting around Perth and WA as a whole. Many of them have double insulation in the form of cover boards and a roof with a cavity. There are also a heap of the more traditional TBH in Perth, Adrian Liorce (sp?) ran A course in Fremantle last year.

I find them better in both cool and warm temperatures. I’m not sure if I’ve offered but you are welcome to look at mine in Bunbury or the WAAS Long Lang at the ECU SW Campus also in Bunbury.

Adam
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Adam, much appreciated. We were coming down your way (Australind) this weekend but changed our plan.

Yes. I do plan to have timber cover boards, a roof cavity, and insulated roof. Mine will be in full sun from sunrise to sunset. It is the little details that I want to make sure I won’t overlook.
 
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