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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

I fear the strange behavior I saw yesterday may be a clue that they're going to take off on me again! There was just a flurry of activity, they were pouring out, flying around the general area above the hive, and pouring back in.

On April 20th, I saw a much more extreme version of this same activity, much higher into the air and all around.
On April 21st, half of my hive swarmed, and I was left queen less after an "experienced" beekeeper "helped" me out by culling all the queen cells and told me to order a new queen.

I had held out hope that a queen would be there after all, but when I inspected again on the 26th, there was not even a hint of a possible queen; they were very testy as well.
I combined one of the hive bodies from that (swarmed) hive with a weaker one using the newspaper method that day, which worked out great.

I ordered a queen, but she's not available until May 6th. I put Pseudo Queen in there on April 27th (a week ago today) to hopefully keep them calm and in good spirits until I can queen them.

So as there was very little brood left after what I had taken to combine, I decided to leave just one hive body on. They had utilized one of the supers for the queen cells that had been destroyed, so I left that alone until I get the new queen and will put the excluder on it then in addition to adding another hive body. There is another super on there that they're storing nectar in.

I figured if I gave them too much room after taking half of them to combine with the other hive, that would be a poor choice. Should I just add it now, or is their behavior indicating that it's probably too late? The queen will be here in 2 days.

Thanks!
 

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When they swarm usually you'll see what appears as smoke by your hive from a short distance.As you get closer the bees are flying what I describe in the form of a perfect orb,flying inside the orb in every which direction.Sometimes they just pour out and go.I see the orb more often than them just bailing out.Never let anyone cut out your queen cells,you shouldn't had to order another queen they were already taking care of that for you!No queen no queencells=queenless.No larvae the right age to produce more queens will get them in trouble.Shouldn't of done a combine you missed an opportunity for making easy increase in your hive count.Whoever had you cut out the queencells should stay out of your apiary until they know better.Cutting out queencells won't stop them from swarming!Might have missed a queencell that hatched out.It's hard to find a fresh hatched virgin.I'm not there looking at what you're seeing could be swarming,could be afterswarm(In a bees mind)could be orientation but I've not witnessed an over abundance of activity as you describe during orientation.Not saying it doesn't happen just saying I've not experienced it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the replies. I hope it was orientation. I did see my swarm, as I call beenado, on the 21st, and the pre swarm on the 20th. It was not like that.
I always post before going into the hives- will I ever learn? :roll eyes:

Anyway, I spoke to soon- Surprise! There's a queen in there!



Any guesses how old she is?



I put another hive body on and left the Pseudo Queen in, was planning on leaving it till Tuesday. Please give me thoughts on that.

Now what to do with the queen I'm getting on Tuesday… A different post all together!
 

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Pull the pseudo out.You don't need it with a queen in there.Might confuse them thinking there's more than one queen.Hard to tell age but she doesn't look frayed.She and you look good to go!Be patient if she's not mated it'll take a few days.Leave her alone after you take the pseudo out for 7 days and check for eggs,if no eggs wait 7 more and check again.You should be seeing eggs by then.If you have another hive pull a frame of emerging bees or two and a frame of honey and nuc the queen you have coming Tuesday.If you don't have the honey than start feeding until you put them in another hive.Won't take the nuke long to build up at all.Presto change where in the hell did all the bees come from!Good luck you're going to do good.It's not the answer to a question it's being able to come up with the question that seperates thinkers and doers from thoughs Who don't and won't.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks a million Slow Drone! I appreciate your advice.

I just took the Pseudo Queen out- literally just a little while ago. They are PISSED at me! It's still light out and 78F, but I've learned my lesson- never again after 8:00!

Good idea about making a nuc. Just brood and honey, no workers to give her? I would assume they would not be very nice to her.
 

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Emerging brood with adhering nurse bees works very nicely.Foragers will just go back to the parent hive for the most part.With emerging brood and nurse bees won't be but real shortly that you have wortkers,nurse bees, and a place for the queen to lay.With emerging brood she can start laying after cells have been polished.You'll be very pleased with yourself and it gives an extra boost to confidence.Let the nuc set for an hour once you've made it up,then put your new queen in.Like installing packages time everything to be ready for the queen to be put in an hour or so before it gets dark out.I learned when I was young ,if a hive has a lot of queen cells going on don,t mess with them at night!Man did they eat my butt up!Lesson learned!:banana:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Emerging brood with adhering nurse bees works very nicely.Foragers will just go back to the parent hive for the most part.With emerging brood and nurse bees won't be but real shortly that you have wortkers,nurse bees, and a place for the queen to lay.With emerging brood she can start laying after cells have been polished.
Thanks so much! It's going to be challenging, as I didn't have the excluders on and learned the hard way why people use them… Never had to my first 2 years.
I think by Tuesday, I'll be able to have something to give her from one of the hive bodies. it really is amazing how much I learn in a day. That is why this "hobby" is an addiction!
 

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You can keep her in the cage for a few days without installing.Keep her in a dark ventilated area,no direct sunlight .Queens like darkness drones like the light.Keep her at room temp around 70 degrees is good,give her a drop of water every day,dip your clean finger in a glass of water and touch the drop of water carefully to the screen,dont touch the screen with your finger.An eye dropper will work.but practice first so as to learn how to dispense only one drop.Important only one drop a day!That will buy you time you may need to have that frame of brood you need.When I mean ventilated I don't men an electric fan a room that isn't musty will work.My little brother is an air assault instructor at Fort Knox and lives in Louis ville.I'll be up that way her in a bit maybe we can get together for some informative hands on beekeeping.I'm older than dirt but very open minded I don't believe a person learn as much by giving them a hard time but much more when they have a good time.I've learn more from people that know less than me than I've learned from those who know more.I don't know why it's always been that way for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I know what you mean about learning! I have learned so much just in the past week. I guess for me, until it actually happens, and I go through it myself- it doesn't matter how much I've read about it in my books and magazines. That goes out the window because of the lack of practical experience.
Thanks for all the great insight and advice.

Keep me posted when you come to Louisville!!
 

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Most certainly will.Nothing like hand s on experience!Books and whatever can be read can help you get familiar with terminology,what might to exspect,to get familiar with diffent techniques and so on.There is a lot of trial and error involved.Thinking about what you're,studying, asking questions can help reduce the error factor.All beekeepers have made their mistakes!Learn from mistakes and look at them as a positive experience.Negativity won't get you any where in life beekeeper or not!Will be looking forward to making your acquaintance in the very near future:thumbsup:
 
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