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I’m confused on the purpose of the hooks on the foundation. I’m also confused about wedges or grooves on the frames.
Can someone explain this to me?
 

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Small Cell Nucs
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I’m confused on the purpose of the hooks on the foundation. I’m also confused about wedges or grooves on the frames.
Can someone explain this to me?
The thing I dont like about the hooks is I am having a time getting the wax foundation to not bow. I have the slotted frames at the bottom, so the bow is not coming from not having room for the foundation to hang freely at the bottom. The bow is coming from the hooks not being seated exactly perfrect in the corner of the wedge getting tacked back in.
The next foundations I use I'm going to try cutting off the hooks and just secure it that way.
 

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Strutt, in a hot hive the wax sags. So the bow is probably due to it hitting the groove. Don't put so much foundation in at once, they only regulate temp in the part of the hive they occupy. Ie only put one more frame than they are working on with foundation, the rest empty. And or try cross wires. I have not tried but if you put wax in like it's plastic I'd expect it to sag/ fall out. Or if you don't mind drones just skip the foundation (but read about it first so you don't get a mess).
 

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When you cut out your wedge,make sure you trim the ridge that is left so that you have a "clean" 90° angle.
With split bottom bars,it is possible to nail them upside down if they are one piece.
The "split " is cut with a round saw blade and is longer on one side.That side should face up.
Most likely the problem is with the foundation.The hooks are not bent to 90° or the wires could be bent.
Don't try to bend them until the foundation is installed in the frame.Then go along and gently push the wire one at a time with your thumb to make it straight.May take a couple of passes.
Many beeks cross wire to keep foundation straight and to provide strength for extracting
Don' t cut off the hooks!! They are the only thing keeping the foundation from slipping in the warmth of the hive.
 

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Everything that Jack said(y) If you have to straighten hooks warm the sheets with a hair dryer or you will shatter the embedded vertical wires loose from the wax. Sometimes in handling they get a bit mangled. Some batches have wires with considerable bend memory in them from the roll they came off in manufacturing. If free to hang without good restraint from embedded crosswiring they will revert to a curve. If I see there is a definite inclination to curve, I will make sure the cross wires are on the outside of the curve. The split pins inserted through the holes in the endbars wont do a satisfactory job unless you just happen to by luck get a batch of wired wax that has little built in curve of the vertical wires.

The spur embedders that are advertised to embed cross wires into the foundation are a cruel joke! You need an electric embedding wand with multiple contact fingers to do a dependable job. In the lower pic shows the cross wires from the back side; literally embedded full depth to grip the foundation for support both vertically and laterally. If you use wired with no hooks or cut off the hooks you need absolute grip on the foundation or it will sag and wrinkle. I like the effect of the wire crimper as it gives much better grip on the foundation and remains taut over time.
62085
62086
 

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Push that wood strip in FIRMLY to capture the hooks, then staple. Otherwise it is a three handed job with a nail and hammer.. Four cross wires then hold it inj place AFTER a GOOD job of electrical embedding.

Soon all of you plastic foundation people will realize that the plastic also absorbs pesticides, and there is no way to recycle the plastic.

Crazy Roland
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I used to lay the foundation out flat and use a pair of pliers to bend each hook back to a 90 degree angle. It was a royal PITA and one of the reasons I eventually went foundationless. I also used two slotted pins on each side to hold the sheet in position. This did eliminate the bow from top to bottom, but not the bow in between the wires which developed once the foundation was placed in a hive. Did I mention I am now foundationless? Combs are a lot straighter and I have a ready supply of drone comb to render for wax every summer.
 

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I have about 10 lbs. of wired wax to use up but now I am mostly rite cell and lately Acorn plastic. I like the looks of a nicely put up wired wax frame but it is time consuming and more expensive. In my colder climate, frames dont get quickly drawn out to the ends and bottom and the bees will chew out a fair bit of those areas in new colonies. When they get around to it they commonly draw it drone

I would rather put in partial sheets of worker plastic then the drones I get at either side are concentrated where I want them, not scattered. Foundationless does have its attractions though.
 

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The thing I dont like about the hooks is I am having a time getting the wax foundation to not bow. I have the slotted frames at the bottom, so the bow is not coming from not having room for the foundation to hang freely at the bottom. The bow is coming from the hooks not being seated exactly perfrect in the corner of the wedge getting tacked back in.
The next foundations I use I'm going to try cutting off the hooks and just secure it that way.
same issue
now get the wired no hooks

GG
 

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I think it is easier to straighten the hooks (Roland covered that well) than it is to try to support no hook foundation. I have had it drop down since the side grip only of the wedge does not seem to hold. When it hangs on the cross wires it buckles. Your luck may vary with temperature and how quick the bees get it fused to the wood. If they build and occupy the center before the top edge is well drawn out and attached it will sag.
 

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It is possible that all of those that went away from crimped wire foundation with hooks did NOT have a good method to embed the wires. Those things that look like pizza cutters do NOT do the same job as a good electric embeder. Back when we had a 5 star General in the oval office, a train transformer was used to do the job, Not one of those modern wimpy train transformers.. You need to find one from a 1920's "Standard Gauge".

Crazy Roland
 
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