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I placed some extracted supers on my hives for the bees to clean off while we were having some unseasonably warm weather. Two days after I placed them we had a full day of rain followed by temps in the high 30s to mid 40s during the day for a week. The weather finally warmed back up into the 50s and 60s for 2-3 days and I went out to pull the supers off. They were full of bees and were actually being filled again. Not anywhere near even partially full but I was able to see some cells with shiny nectar(?) honey(?)

We had another cold snap rolling through and I did not have time to brush the bees off each frame to remove the supers. I placed an escape under each super and closed them up. It will be time to take the supers off here in the next day or two. I figured the escape would force the bees down and keep the hive area smaller with the trap on for heat retention.

My questions are: I know I probably goofed up by leaving the supers on too long. Is the nectar that I saw in the supers likely honey moved up from the brood chamber? With the unseasonably warm temperatures there are still a few dandelions and goldenrod about in the area. Now that there is nectar and/or honey in the supers again, how should I go about cleaning them out? Should I just shake them out and pack the supers away for next season? Or should I try to give this back to the bees in case they moved it up from the brood box?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I would guess the shiny stuff is new nectar. Place the supers above the inner covers and the bees should bring it all back down into the hive within a day or two. Once clean, you can remove them when the temps drop and the bees start to cluster in the hive.
 
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I would guess the shiny stuff is new nectar. Place the supers above the inner covers and the bees should bring it all back down into the hive within a day or two. Once clean, you can remove them when the temps drop and the bees start to cluster in the hive.
Thanks for the reply. Does placing the inner cover cause the bees to act differently when nectar is present? Before potentially placing the inner covers below the super the bees were filling the cells with nectar. My lack of experience would lead me to believe that the bees would continue to fill the cells anyways despite the smaller "entrance" to the top super that the inner cover creates. I would love it if the bees cleared the nectar out if I placed the inner cover between the super and the top brood box. The last thing I want them to do is to move honey up into the super. I am going to take the be escapes off in the next day or two. When I do that I will get a better look at just how much nectar they put in the supers since placing them to be cleaned. Thanks again for your time.
 

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The bees see the area above the innercover as being outside the hive, and not part of their hive.

Crazy Roland
 

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I think JWPalmer's suggestion is your best and safest approach. When I am doing an end-of-season clean up of partially filled frames, I will often place many boxes full of partially filled frames several hundred yards from my hives and allow the bees to rob them all out. It happens very quickly, if they have flying weather. A reported downside of this approach is the possibility of encouraging robbing and possible disease/mite transfer. I have not personally observed either of those, but that might be more to do with location and timing (and maybe luck), than anything else. Just another option.
 

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If they started to fill with nectar, not honey, wouldn't that mean they are bringing IN something and not moving stuff around.

How do you know they don't Need the extra and that is why they are filling it? <-- this is a question that I guess you won't know unless you pull everything apart and inspect, which is too late now.
Because of this question I would put the frames out away from the hives and let them clean it there. Or hold it for next year?
 

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Nectar is easy to shake out. Shake them out over the bars. The girls will take the nectar and put it away below.
 

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I would guess the shiny stuff is new nectar. Place the supers above the inner covers and the bees should bring it all back down into the hive within a day or two. Once clean, you can remove them when the temps drop and the bees start to cluster in the hive.
I did that this year as usual to have them clean wet supers, above inner cover, and yes, full of bees and new nectar. Had to put them out and away from the hives to have the frames cleaned which I don’t like to do. I had cut comb, mostly capped nicely, but the bees did not use new wax for them, so they were slightly yellow and not as tender as usual. Weird year to say the least.
 

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Provided ya still have time/temps for bees to re-orient some of their honey crowns, you may be able to get far toward resolving your issue by placing all the frames in question beneath the brood chamber.
Yes, it means un-stacking each hive in question, placing the body(s) with frames on bottom boards, then re-stacking for a few days to a week, (likely only few days, but?), then un-stack all, remove key bodies/frames, then re-stack what is left for the cold season.
Honey bees hate like everything having honey stored "under" brood chambers.
 

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Provided ya still have time/temps for bees to re-orient some of their honey crowns, you may be able to get far toward resolving your issue by placing all the frames in question beneath the brood chamber.
Yes, it means un-stacking each hive in question, placing the body(s) with frames on bottom boards, then re-stacking for a few days to a week, (likely only few days, but?), then un-stack all, remove key bodies/frames, then re-stack what is left for the cold season.
Honey bees hate like everything having honey stored "under" brood chambers.
Yes, a good way to get rid of crystalized honey frames also, they will clean it out.
 
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