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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


This is what is locally called honey locust. I've seen it mentioned more than once on forums and also in the wikipedia article that it is not a nectar producing plant despite it's name. The thing is it's been covered up for about a week with honey bees, bumble bees, butterflies, tiny little wasps, and stuff I can't even identify. Everything working furiously - no pollen visible in pollen baskets.

So, what's up with that?
 

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What we call Honey Locust here is a tree,,,,Produces Locust fence post,,,firewood,,,,has a panicle of flowers in May. Member of the Legume family. Pics a little fuzzy,,,but that is "Hercules Club" It is referred to as "Devils Walking Stick." Has thorns and at the years end growth is a cluster of thorns.. Hence the name. It is bloom here and bees love it.

Rick SoMd
 

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Dave,,,Are the leaves in the pic from the plant in bloom? It probably is and do not match the Hercules club round here. So,,,,I want to know too:D I'm not so sure now. The flowers look like it though.

My bad:doh:


Rick SoMd
 

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Dave,

Honey Locust is most easily distinguished by the covering of very large thorns and the long seed pods they have in the fall. As stated, they are not a substantial nectar producer. Oddly enough, the Black locust is a nearly thornless tree that blooms in the spring and is well liked by the honey bees. I've read of folks using the Black locust for posts, but not the honey locust. The honey locust is a good splitting and burning wood once you get past the darn thorns.

Chris
 

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I don't know what kind of black locust trees you have but ours are far from near thornless!! I admit they produce far fewer thorns than a HL and all are found on the branches, but I have lost many a glove to the chipper from black locust thorns. Black locust wood is much harder than HL. I have seen sparks fly from my chainsaw many times cutting BL.:D
 

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I don't know what kind of black locust trees you have but ours are far from near thornless!! I admit they produce far fewer thorns than a HL and all are found on the branches, but I have lost many a glove to the chipper from black locust thorns. Black locust wood is much harder than HL. I have seen sparks fly from my chainsaw many times cutting BL.:D
Thanks NasalSponge,

I yield to your experience. We have a plethora of the darn HL. I honestly don't even notice the BL until they bloom. I've got some at the bottom of the hill, I will take a closer look the next time I'm down there.:)

Chris
 

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For years I had a 10" thorn I took off the trunk of a HL, nasty trees but then again BL are considered invasive and are one of only two trees that are illegal to plant in the city limits here. Another thorny tree that grows here is the Bodark or horse apple (actually called an Osage orange).:D
 

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Honey locust and black locust are here but I'm not sure of the flower difference. The large beautiful flowers I refer to are on the thorn less species. (honey I assume)

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
The plant in the picture has lots of thorns on it, but not huge ones. It also has large dark brown bean looking seed pods in the fall. It grows really fast, and the wood is pithy and soft, and it tends to grow in patches of many plants. It gets 15 - 20 feet tall, and cattle eat all of the leaves that they can reach and the rest of them in the fall when they fall to the ground. It sounds like the Hercules club plant that Rick mentioned is probably the same thing. Like I said - it's called honey locust locally, and it has some of the same properties of what must be an actual honey locust, but not the same.

It is definitely this plant Aralia spinosa now that I had the other common names to search for. Thanks.

Anyway, I'm glad for the nectar that it's producing when nothing much else is. I wish for more plants like it as far as that goes. :)
 
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