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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm embarrassed to ask this question but should I be washing the jars before I fill them?

Up to now I have been running them through the dish washer but I cleaned some plastic
bears and the heat deformed them to the point the tops would not hold which got me thinking
that perhaps this wasn't the best thing to do.

What do you guys do?
 

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I just fill 'em up. Way too much work to try to wash 'em and I presume they come food-ready from the factory.
 

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There was a discussion of this last year. I think the general consensus was that mason jars should be washed since they would normally be sterilized by boiling to make jelly jam. Purpose specific honey jars are usually packed upside down so dust and dirt don't get in them and can be used a is. Funny, though, mason jars usually come (at least when I buy them) with lids already on.

I have no idea if this really is good advice or not. I use honey jars from Dadant as is; I sometimes wash mason jars.

Take this for what you will.
 

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I wash the mason jars that I use in hot water or run them thru the dishwasher. I suspect the lids come preattached to mason jars because that make is easier to pack the jars (lid on every jar = correct count, less stuff to put in box), and it makes quality control (correct # of lids) easier.

The plastic clamp shells that I use for cutcomb I use straight from the package. I get them from a restaurant supply place and I have never seen a restaurant wash the "take out" containers before filling them. I assume that they start clean or restaurants would have to wash them first.
 

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My question is...why would you NOT wash them? If for your own consumption, totally up to you. If you sell them, absolutely. Assume they are food ready from the factory? Ever been in a factory or warehouse? You owe it to your customers to have clean containers, free from mouse droppings, insects, production debris, etc.
 

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I use a product called Starsan. It is a sanitizer and easy. I fill up a bucket with water add Starsan and do a dunk with the jar/bottle and then let it drain. Same with the lids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is no question that washing them is a good idea but like I said the heat warped the plastic bears I and queenlines that I washed
and it adds so much time to the bottling process that I think I'm going to stop and see how it goes. I also think honey has enough
antibacterial qualities that it should be safe, as long as there isn't a stink bug hiding in the jar.
 

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My question is...why would you NOT wash them? If for your own consumption, totally up to you. If you sell them, absolutely. Assume they are food ready from the factory? Ever been in a factory or warehouse? You owe it to your customers to have clean containers, free from mouse droppings, insects, production debris, etc.
I would go broke washing all of mine. From the supplier they come in a large box in a large clear bag. They say washing them is not required nor recommended. I've never seem any production debris in the thousands of bottles I fill a year. I make sure they stay in the condition I receive them in until I pull them into my bottling location where they are dropped into another smaller clear bag in a box. Put some work ahead of time to make sure they stay as clean as they come to you and you shouldn't have to clean them again. Wash if you want, it's your call, but the customer will not pay additional money for your additional work. If you've got mouse droppings or insects in your bottling facility you've got some other work to do.
 

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I would go broke washing all of mine. From the supplier they come in a large box in a large clear bag. They say washing them is not required nor recommended. I've never seem any production debris in the thousands of bottles I fill a year. I make sure they stay in the condition I receive them in until I pull them into my bottling location where they are dropped into another smaller clear bag in a box. Put some work ahead of time to make sure they stay as clean as they come to you and you shouldn't have to clean them again. Wash if you want, it's your call, but the customer will not pay additional money for your additional work. If you've got mouse droppings or insects in your bottling facility you've got some other work to do.

I agree with this. I use all glass with the exception of the lids which, unfortunately, are plastic. I just fill them and I'm done. I don't use plastic unless I have too. We have way too much of that and have for a long, long time. The only time I'm forced to use plastic is when I ship. Then, like when I use glass, I fill directly into new product. I don't re-use plastic at all. Ever. I do re-use glass but only after a normal sterilization as mentioned above for mason jars. Same for my maple syrup.
 

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Ravenseye, do you sell/ship your maple syrup? I only buy maple syrup and I would like to try yours if you sell to the public.

I have thought a lot about going to more glass sizes and do only one plastic size which would be the 8 oz bears.

I don't wash plastic. I keep them in jumbo Ziplocks until I'm ready for them. I put the glass mason jars (pint and quart) through the dishwasher with hot dry time.
 

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Ravenseye, do you sell/ship your maple syrup? I only buy maple syrup and I would like to try yours if you sell to the public.

I have thought a lot about going to more glass sizes and do only one plastic size which would be the 8 oz bears.

I don't wash plastic. I keep them in jumbo Ziplocks until I'm ready for them. I put the glass mason jars (pint and quart) through the dishwasher with hot dry time.
Sorry, I don't. I bottle a few for family / friend gifts and then bulk the rest. I don't get all that much to begin with. Last year I tried some cans and they worked out pretty good. Not sure what I'll do this year.
 

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Unless there is an issue from my own storage, I inspect each bottle when bottling, but otherwise no. My wife and I have had this debate and if we should run them through the dishwasher (although she washes dishes before putting them in). The manufacturing process eliminates any concerns that I have, the packaging (as noted above "upside down") helps. I've never found anything of concern in all he bottles I have done. There are lots of sites that explain the manufacturing process for glass jars....here is one: https://www.ebottles.com/articles/GlassMan.htm


That said, you should do what makes you feel best about your product...
 

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I find that the glass jars stink. Inside and out. I realize this is likely some former or releasing agent or lubricant from the manufacturing process, but fragrance is a huge part of the satisfaction in a food product. I also do t trust warehouses not to have roaches and mice etc scampering around. Is that distance or dander on the case of jars.

I therefore wash and sterilize all jars seals and ri go as if I was Watergate canning.
 
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