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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks for looking over my question.

I'm still unclear as to when I need to remove the honey frames, if at all, and I was hoping to get some direction. Most of what I can find seems to deal with "overwintering," and to be honest, I don't even know if this is something I need to be too concerned with due to my location. I live in S. California (USA) where we have really nice weather. (See signature for details).

My brood chamber consist of (1) Deep and (1) Medium, with a medium honey super on top, separated by a queen excluder.

The honey super was almost 100% covered in capped honey a few weeks ago, so I did harvest (2) med frames worth, and left the other six frames in tact for the bees. They have also been filing out the two new frames as well.

I have read many times that it's best to leave honey for the bees, especially for the first year. I have also read that 40 lbs is about average for an average hive.

My question(s):

First, I'm not exactly sure which honey should be saved. Can I simply just leave the queen exculder and honey super on if I won't need to treat the bees?

Also, since the DAYtime winter colds only average around 65 here, is this something that I even need to be overly concerned about? I realize that we do go into dearths, but I'm still learning about that for my area and I want to make sure that my (bee) house is in order as we end summer.


Thanks again,
b1rd
 

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All beekeeping is local so the best advice will come from someone in San Diego.

A deep plus a medium is ok for overwintering where I am in South Carolina but it might not work for you. You don't really have winter but that also means the bees are active all year round and consume more stores than a cluster sitting still in Minnesota.

San Diego is a really cool place. Never lived there but spent a lot of time there with the Navy. Hard to beat the climate if you can afford it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply.

Your answer is sort of where I get confused a bit, and I'm throwing this out for anybody-

Since the bees are pretty active all year, I would have thought they might not need as much honey since they are able to fly all year and forage. I also understand that I'll have dearths throughout the year (I think).

Are you saying that they will be using up more resources than they are able to produce, even though they are still able to fly & forage? And if so, then would that be because of the lack of food sources? IE" Nectar producing plants?

Thanks, and I'll have a follow up question if this one is addressed.


b1rd
 

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I think it all depends on what you have in SD in the winter. Where I am, there is a dearth from now till April. I'm only in my fourth season but I've noticed they go through more honey now than they will in January. We only "sort of" have winter here but I think they are burning through stores more now because they are flying around collecting pollen and water.

In January, my bees hunker down for 4 weeks of "winter" and consume way less than they do now. Of course there's more bees now than there will be which means more mouths to feed.

I guess the bottom line is that I know from talking to other locals and through my own limited experience that I'm good with a deep plus a packed medium for winter. For all I know there could be a monster flow from who knows what in your area in November...you really need an answer from someone local. There's probably a local club or Facebook page.
 
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