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I'm about to extract and have wondered what concerns are out there for extracting, bottling and selling with the current pandemic.

I am a backyard beekeeper so it would not be a significant amount but enough of a concern that I want to educate myself.
 

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I'm about to extract and have wondered what concerns are out there for extracting, bottling and selling with the current pandemic.

I am a backyard beekeeper so it would not be a significant amount but enough of a concern that I want to educate myself.
I have been wondering about that too. I have a little honor stand setup with a cash box, but that would not conform to a sellers responsibility to sanitize commonly handled surfaces. It exposes me to handling things too as I bring in remaining containers, cash box, and money etc. Concerns are liability issues re. customer protection as well as my own.

Presently leaning toward not marketing this season. Sounds like I may be exploring the creamed or spreadable honey process which makes keeping it over a better proposition. My surplus to sell would only be 300 pounds or so and only for fun money.
 

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I would bump up my liability coverage to the max I could get, If I was to sell honey extracted and packaged this year. but in retrospect since I got a memo from my insurance provider that I think says that my insurance doesn't contain coverage for covid-19, I would look for a rider if you can get one for the policy.
 

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I understand honey to be a pretty good antiviral, so I doubt you can spread coronavirus in honey. Any type of package could possibly transfer the virus, but how in the world could someone prove they got coronavirus from your stand? Any can in the grocery store they picked up could be the culprit -- the gas pump they touched on the way home -- the air they breathed -- the mail they received that day.
 

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We sell now; we wear a mask, most customers do too, and fill their jars handing them back with a wipe. We wash the money and tell them we wash the money. We also sell to the farm stand up the road; they sell Gouda cheese they make, eggs, some local meats, local milk, small 8 1/2” - 9” pies for a whopping $14, local bread, maple syrup, and our honey, liquid and creamed. She is very very busy at this time of Covid-19. She has ordered up to 75 loaves of bread for about a weeks worth of sales. Pies sell out immediately as does the milk. No one says anything to her I guess because its considered essential, same with selling the honey. I guess its all about the location you live in.
 

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I understand honey to be a pretty good antiviral, so I doubt you can spread coronavirus in honey. Any type of package could possibly transfer the virus, but how in the world could someone prove they got coronavirus from your stand? Any can in the grocery store they picked up could be the culprit -- the gas pump they touched on the way home -- the air they breathed -- the mail they received that day.
They dont have to prove anything! Just make a claim against you and you have to spend the same money defending it as if it were legitimate.

According to our provisions a merchandiser has to routinely sanitize items handled by customers so I think this rules out self serve. Ignorance is not a defense in the face of the law.
 

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They dont have to prove anything! Just make a claim against you and you have to spend the same money defending it as if it were legitimate.

According to our provisions a merchandiser has to routinely sanitize items handled by customers so I think this rules out self serve. Ignorance is not a defense in the face of the law.
:thumbsup:
 
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