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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I have this one problem bee hive... I got them as a nuc in the Spring. They did extremely well, then swarmed. They did not successfully re-queen. So, long story short, I combined them with another weak hive with a fairly new marked queen. The combination seemed to go fine. But I was unable to find the queen and no new brood was showing up. Activity at the entrance continued to dwindle and no new bees. I figured the hive was just refusing to survive and was dying off. Yesterday, I did an inspection and noticed a funny stripped pattern on the bottom screen (looking down from above). So, I pulled off the brood box, picked up the screened base and turned it over to find that the bees had built honeycomb suspended from the bottom of the screened hive bottom. On, and it is loaded with brood, so the queen has been down there laying eggs. The lack of activity at the hive entrance was because the bees were going to and from the new comb under the hive.
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So, any ideas on what to do now?
 

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I had exactly the same problem with a hive a few days ago. I can tell what I did, but have no idea if it was the right thing to do or not :)

First thing I did was replace the base and BB with a new one. I then placed the original two bottom brood boxes back on the BB. I then placed an empty box on top of that and shook as many of the bees off the comb as possible into the empty box.

I then took another box of empty frames with no wires and made loops around the entire frame. I then pried each one of the combs suspended off the screen and slid them in between the wires on the empty frames and placed them into the empty box I had shaken the bees into.

I also duct taped over the opening in the back of the BB to make sure that the bees did not return there and start making more comb. It took 3-4 days before I no longer saw bees hovering around the back side of the hive trying to get in.

I will leave the hive alone for a couple weeks and then will inspect to see if I got the queen and see any laying. Hopefully I did and hopefully she has taken up residence in the brood boxes. If not hopefully I see queen cells, although it's pretty late in the season for that.

If I do have a queen in the brood boxes I will move the cut out comb to the top of the hive, on top of the two honey supers and let the brood hatch. Once it's hatched I will probably just pull the whole box and melt down the comb.

~Matt
 

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I'm a 2nd yr beek so I'm no expert but the first thing I'd want to do is get my queen safe. I'd capture my queen and put her in a safe place. Then I'd take the combs off rubber band or tie them onto frames. Then I'd put the reassembled frames and comb back into the hive. Finally I'd put my queen in with them. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, this is what I did:

I took the brood box and put in on a sheet of plywood. I then removed the comb from the bottom screen and put into frames using rubber bands like the pic above, just like I was doing a cut out. As I was doing this, I brushed all of the bees into the brood box. I removed two partially finished frames from the brood box and replaced them with the frames with the comb that I had rubber banded to frames. I replaced the base on the stand after scraping off the residue of the comb and put the brood box back on top of it and put the lid on it. I did not see the queen, but I am confident that she was in the bees that I dropped/brushed off into the brood box. For good measure, I put a feeder in with sugar water to hopefully keep the bees in the hive and not have them walk out and under and rebuild the comb underneath.

I have absolutely no idea if this was the right thing to do or not, but that's what I did.
 
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