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will honey cell LENGTH vary?
reason I"m asking is I"m preparing my dead TBH for another try. the old brood cells lined up along the center line quite well, but the honey combs "bulged" or went off center such that they can not be removed straight up but I have to shift cells to get enough room to remove a bar. in either case I"m going to have to cut honey comb to get them lined up, but I was wondering if it were possible the 'bulge" was caused by a longer cell vice straying off the center line. anyone?- Mike
 

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Often time there is a rainbow of honey around the perimeter of frames with longer cells. Drones are longer. Those things are no problem. Don't necessary think about cell length rather the surface the cells are drawn off of to be parrellel and a particular distance from eachother, ideally the surface shoudl be only in 2 dimensions. Bad things happen once those surfaces begin to curve, warp and change, makes moving frames a pain in the butt. One of the reasons I don't run top bars.
 

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yes! that is the reason 9 frames are placed in a 10 frame lang. by removing a frame in a drawn super, then re-spacing the frames the bees will lengthen the comb to maintain bee space.
managing bee space in a foundationless hive can be more difficult.
 

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Massively. It is recommended you use spacers once into the honey area. Brood areas tend to be 34, 36, 38mm depending on bees. Honey combs can easily be 50mm. Spacers can be made from anything the same length and depth as the topbars
http://www.kelleybees.com/products/images/main/254-9.JPG

Highly recomend one of these guys. I am not a big fan of the nail in spacers. Once the frames are set for a month or to the build up of propolis on frame-rests will self-align
 

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http://www.kelleybees.com/products/images/main/254-9.JPG

Highly recomend one of these guys. I am not a big fan of the nail in spacers. Once the frames are set for a month or to the build up of propolis on frame-rests will self-align
Top Bar hive though no need for spacers.
The space between the bar centers is set by the top bar width. No nailing is required you just insert a wooden shim down the side of the top bars.
This is considerably more efficient to the bees for honey storage. Extending (fattening) an already drawn comb to add more honey is less effort to them than having to draw a completely new comb.
 
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