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Those are spectacular!! I have a lavender farm with bees and I'm delighted to see someone capture the beauty of this perfect plant for bees. The honey is wonderful, by the way.
 

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Did you take those beautiful photos?
 

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Spectacular. I never get that much depth of field working that close, even with a DSLR. What are you using? What aperture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Spectacular. I never get that much depth of field working that close, even with a DSLR. What are you using? What aperture?
These were all shot at F/16 using a Canon 100mm Macro on a 5D Mark III with some fill flash. I have done multiple exposures and then stacked them for even more DOF but didn't do it on these.

Thanks for the comments everyone.
 

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I've heard of that stacking method and want to try it on microscope shots, but it would be hard to get a bee to stay still that long.

Their level of activity is the real test of my patience, and I suppose I just need to learn patience. My cheat fallback is to set the Nikon D5100 to the sports action preset. That gives multiple shots with autofocus on each, but prefers high shutter speed, so the depth of field typically suffers. I might get better results if I actually practiced real photography. Still, sometimes I get lucky with all those shots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yep they are very busy! I wonder if they are a little slower first thing in the morning? Try using the same focus method your camera uses when in the sports preset but try using manual mode.
 

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Some of the best pictures I ever got were of a single bee in late afternoon. I was trying to figure out what variety she was because her wings looked different ... serrated tips instead of rounded. Plus, she stayed on one blossom of garlic chives for a long time, and worked slowly and deliberately, allowing me more time to set up.

I since identified her as Apis mellifera geriatrica, an old bee nearing the end of her career. They say a lot to me ... you rarely see pictures of old bees, which I ascribe to age discrimination. That faithful old girl was still at work when she was almost certainly having difficulty flying. The version below is compressed and over-corrected.

Summer-Garden 129 Compr.jpg
 

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Great shots.
How long before someone takes that bottom shot and makes it a thumbnail for sticking you tongue out?
 
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