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The bee population is dropping, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, by around 30% each year. The Florida State Beekeepers Association is asking lawmakers for $3.5 million to build a new honey bee research facility at the University of Florida. With that, they hope to provide Congress with real-time information on bee problems directly affecting Florida. (WINK)
 

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I was down there last March. They were claiming that they were the biggest entomology department in the world. I was fortunate to get a tour of the facility and found it VERY impressive. They can't provide "real-time" information right now? What kind of facility do you get for $3.5mil?
 

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• Buzzing bees are the sound of money in Florida. The sunshine state is the third largest producer of honey in the U.S. The industry made more than $23 million in 2012, but experts say our honeybee population is dying – threatening to cripple the state's economy. Now, there is a plan to save both; and a local beekeeper is behind it. (NBC 2, WZVN) http://www.nbc-2.com/story/24958478/bee-bill-could-help-floridas-economy#.UyL6UNK1Euc
http://www.abc-7.com/story/24958478/bee-bill-could-help-floridas-economy#.UyL6WdK1Euc
 

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Well, does anyone really know what is going on with bees and beekeepers? Spending a few million dollars on a beelab doesn't seem like a lot; however, providing good information for congress to use seems like a farce -- like they would know good information when they saw it let alone know what to do with it before it was twisted and turned for political gain.

I get email news items from American Bee Journal and sometimes it provides information that makes me rethink the conventional wisdom.

Based upon a recent American Bee Journal email report -- from around February 2014-- they report of the results from a paper written by EcoHealth Alliance, the last 2 paragraphs of the summary of that report read:

"In Europe and the U.S., the long term declines have been documented , yet the overall number of colonies globally has increased 45% since 1961. This in conjunction with the 300 percent rise in pollinator-dependent crops requires the industry to manage honey bees like never before; millions of honey bees are moved across the country annually to pollinate crops.

One factor that is vital to understanding the metrics of long-term colony declines lies in the methodology of counting colonies. In the 1980's, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reduced the number of colonies in the U.S. by one million by changing the formulation of how colonies were counted previously; the NASS negated to count colonies in operations that had five or fewer colonies. This change, in addition to socioeconomic and political factors, contributed to the decline of colony numbers over previous decades."

Makes me wonder just who to believe.
 
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